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The historical audacity of the Louisiana Purchase - Judy Walton
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-audacity-behind-the-louisiana-purchase-judy-walton When the French offered up the Louisiana Territory, Thomas Jefferson knew this real estate deal was too good to pass up. How did the President justify the purchase that doubled the size of the United States? Judy Walton provides President Jefferson's reasoning. Lesson by Judy Walton, animation by Sumit Seru, Rohit Tandon and Kevin Jaako.
Views: 216758 TED-Ed
Thomas Jefferson & His Democracy: Crash Course US History #10
 
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In which John Green teaches you about founding father and third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson. Jefferson is a somewhat controversial figure in American history, largely because he, like pretty much all humans, was a big bundle of contradictions. Jefferson was a slave-owner who couldn't decide if he liked slavery. He advocated for small government, but expanded federal power more than either of his presidential predecessor. He also idealized the independent farmer and demonized manufacturing, but put policies in place that would expand industrial production in the US. Controversy may ensue as we try to deviate a bit from the standard hagiography/slander story that usually told about old TJ. John explores Jefferson's election, his policies, and some of the new nation's (literally and figuratively) formative events that took place during Jefferson's presidency. In addition to all this, Napoleon drops in to sell Louisiana, John Marshall sets the course of the Supreme Court, and John Adams gets called a tiny tyrant. Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. Thomas Jefferson is remembered as the Founding Father responsible for saying all men are created equal in The Declaration of Independence: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/the-declaration-of-independence Jefferson didn't always practice what he preached though, as seen in his mixed views on American Indians: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/excerpts-from-thomas-jefferson-s-writings-on-american-indians Follow us! http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse http://www.twitter.com/realjohngreen http://www.twitter.com/crashcoursestan http://www.twitter.com/raoulmeyer http://www.twitter.com/thoughtbubbler http://www.twitter.com/saysdanica Like us! http://www.facebook.com/youtubecrashcourse Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 2129623 CrashCourse
The Making of a Nation: Louisiana Purchase
 
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A series of unexpected events transformed the U.S. from a small nation along the Atlantic Ocean into a large country that stretched across most of North America. This video tells the story of the Louisiana Purchase. Originally published at - http://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/3550530.html
Views: 101008 VOA Learning English
The Louisiana Purchase
 
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A brief survey of the key events surrounding the Louisiana Purchase, including Jefferson's constitutional dilemma and the Lewis and Clark Expedition
Views: 76261 Tom Richey
The Louisiana Purchase
 
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This video presents the details of The Louisiana Purchase
Views: 99844 McKeow Tube
Thomas Jefferson's Lost Cause: Louisiana Purchase, Markets, Finance, Economics (2003)
 
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The Louisiana Purchase (French: Vente de la Louisiane "Sale of Louisiana") was the acquisition of the Louisiana territory (828,000 square miles) by the United States from France in 1803. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0195176073/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0195176073&linkCode=as2&tag=tra0c7-20&linkId=2e72600b6cc275ccc91de54884da164b The U.S. paid fifty million francs ($11,250,000 USD) and a cancellation of debts worth eighteen million francs ($3,750,000 USD) for a total of sixty-eight million francs ($15,000,000 USD). The Louisiana territory included land from fifteen present U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. The territory contained land that forms Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska; the portion of Minnesota west of the Mississippi River; a large portion of North Dakota; a large portion of South Dakota; the northeastern section of New Mexico; the northern portion of Texas; the area of Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado east of the Continental Divide; Louisiana west of the Mississippi River (plus New Orleans); and small portions of land within the present Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. Its population was around 60,000 inhabitants, of whom half were African slaves.[1] The Kingdom of France controlled the Louisiana territory from 1699 until it was ceded to Spain in 1762. Napoleon in 1800, hoping to re-establish an empire in North America, regained ownership of Louisiana. However, France's failure to put down the revolt in Saint-Domingue, coupled with the prospect of renewed warfare with the United Kingdom, prompted Napoleon to sell Louisiana to the United States. The Americans originally sought to purchase only the port city of New Orleans and its adjacent coastal lands, but quickly accepted the bargain. The Louisiana Purchase occurred during the term of the third President of the United States, Thomas Jefferson. Before the purchase was finalized, the decision faced Federalist Party opposition; they argued that it was unconstitutional to acquire any territory. Jefferson agreed that the U.S. Constitution did not contain explicit provisions for acquiring territory, but he asserted that his constitutional power to negotiate treaties was sufficient. The Louisiana Purchase Treaty was signed on 30 April by Robert Livingston, James Monroe, and Barbé Marbois in Paris. Jefferson announced the treaty to the American people on July 4. After the signing of the Louisiana Purchase agreement in 1803, Livingston made this famous statement, "We have lived long, but this is the noblest work of our whole lives...From this day the United States take their place among the powers of the first rank."[30] The United States Senate ratified the treaty with a vote of twenty-four to seven on October 20. The Senators who voted against the treaty were: Simeon Olcott and William Plumer of New Hampshire, William Wells and Samuel White of Delaware, James Hillhouse and Uriah Tracy of Connecticut, and Timothy Pickering of Massachusetts. On the following day, October 21, 1803, the Senate authorized Jefferson to take possession of the territory and establish a temporary military government. In legislation enacted on October 31, Congress made temporary provisions for local civil government to continue as it had under French and Spanish rule and authorized the President to use military forces to maintain order. Plans were also set forth for several missions to explore and chart the territory, the most famous being the Lewis and Clark Expedition. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisiana_Purchase
Views: 1508 The Film Archives
The Louisiana Purchase in a Nutshell
 
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A fast and fun look at the Louisiana Purchase, Sacajewea, Thomas Jefferson, Lewis and Clark. This is one of many pieces produced by HCPS-TV at Henrico County Schools.
Views: 127984 jpg88pava
The War of 1812 - Crash Course US History #11
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the War of 1812. The War of 1812 was fought between the United States and its former colonial overlord England. It started in, you guessed it 1812. The war lasted until 1815, and it resolved very little. John will take you through the causes of the war, tell you a little bit about the fighting itself, and get into just why the US Army couldn't manage to make any progress invading Canada. And yes, Canadians, we're going to talk about the White House getting burned down. The upshot: no territory changed hands, and most of the other bones of contention were solved prior to the actual war. Although nothing much changed for the US and England, the Native Americans were the big losers. Tecumseh was killed, and the Indian tribes lost a lot of territory. Watch as John lays it all out for you. Also, check out #1812problems on Twitter. It's awesome. Follow Us! @thecrashcourse @1812problems @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @saysdanica @thoughtbubbler Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 3449502 CrashCourse
The Remarkable Story of Jefferson, Napoleon and the Men behind the Louisiana Purchase (2003)
 
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The Louisiana Purchase Treaty was signed on April 30 by Robert Livingston, James Monroe, and François Barbé-Marbois in Paris. Jefferson announced the treaty to the American people on July 4. After the signing of the Louisiana Purchase agreement in 1803, Livingston made this famous statement, "We have lived long, but this is the noblest work of our whole lives... From this day the United States take their place among the powers of the first rank."[40] The United States Senate advised and consented to ratification of the treaty with a vote of twenty-four to seven on October 20. The Senators who voted against the treaty were: Simeon Olcott and William Plumer of New Hampshire, William Wells and Samuel White of Delaware, James Hillhouse and Uriah Tracy of Connecticut, and Timothy Pickering of Massachusetts. On the following day, October 21, 1803, the Senate authorized Jefferson to take possession of the territory and establish a temporary military government. In legislation enacted on October 31, Congress made temporary provisions for local civil government to continue as it had under French and Spanish rule and authorized the President to use military forces to maintain order. Plans were also set forth for several missions to explore and chart the territory, the most famous being the Lewis and Clark Expedition. A timeline of legislation can be found at the Library of Congress: American Memory:The Louisiana Purchase Legislative Timeline--1803-1804. The American government used $3 million in gold as a down payment, and issued bonds for the balance to pay France for the purchase. Earlier that year, Francis Baring and Company of London had become the U.S. government's official banking agent in London. Because of this favored position, the U.S. asked the Baring firm to handle the transaction. Francis Baring's son Alexander was in Paris at the time and helped in the negotiations.[51] Another Baring advantage was a close relationship with Hope and Company of Amsterdam. The two banking houses worked together to facilitate and underwrite the Purchase. Because Napoleon wanted to receive his money as quickly as possible, the two firms received the American bonds and shipped the gold to France. Napoleon used the money to finance his planned invasion of England, which never took place. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisiana_Purchase
Views: 116 Remember This
Who Said We Didn't Fight Back?...Louisiana Uprising of 1811
 
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We want to create content MORE FREQUENTLY and keep this information FREE TO THE PUBLIC/MASSES. You can help make that possible with as little as $5 per month. CLICK ON THE LINK and help us to TELL OUR STORIES. https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3799372 We are rarely taught of instances where our ancestors fought back against the harsh treatment of White Supremacy unless it was in the form of REFORM. Most of our ancestors fought for revolutionary change which was for TRUE LIBERATION. We wanted our own sovereignty because it was completely unnatural for one race to rule over another. Learn how our heroic ancestors had the audacity to fight trying to create a Black Republic around the New Orleans territory to ensure true democracy and freedom for blacks then and for future generations.
Views: 79272 The Great Griot
The Gadsden Purchase (Late Night with Jimmy Fallon)
 
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An audience member demands to know why there have been no jokes about The Gadsden Purchase. Subscribe NOW to The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon: http://bit.ly/1nwT1aN Watch The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon Weeknights 11:35/10:35c Get more Jimmy Fallon: Follow Jimmy: http://Twitter.com/JimmyFallon Like Jimmy: https://Facebook.com/JimmyFallon Get more The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon: Follow The Tonight Show: http://Twitter.com/FallonTonight Like The Tonight Show: https://Facebook.com/FallonTonight The Tonight Show Tumblr: http://fallontonight.tumblr.com/ Get more NBC: NBC YouTube: http://bit.ly/1dM1qBH Like NBC: http://Facebook.com/NBC Follow NBC: http://Twitter.com/NBC NBC Tumblr: http://nbctv.tumblr.com/ NBC Google+: https://plus.google.com/+NBC/posts The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon features hilarious highlights from the show including: comedy sketches, music parodies, celebrity interviews, ridiculous games, and, of course, Jimmy's Thank You Notes and hashtags! You'll also find behind the scenes videos and other great web exclusives. The Gadsden Purchase (Late Night with Jimmy Fallon) http://www.youtube.com/fallontonight
The Louisiana Purchase: A Treasury of Forgotten Details and New Insights (2003)
 
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Thomas James Fleming (born July 5, 1927) is an American military historian and historical novelist and the author of over forty nonfiction and fiction titles. His work reflects a particular interest on the American Revolution, with titles such as Liberty! The American Revolution And The Future Of America, Duel: Alexander Hamilton, Aaron Burr, and the History of America and Washington's Secret War: The Hidden History of Valley Forge. He is the only author ever to have won main selections for the Book-of-the-Month Club in both fiction and nonfiction categories. He is best known for his appearances in C-Span, PBS, A&E, and the History Channel. After brief stints as a newspaperman and magazine editor, he became a full-time writer in 1960. His first history book, Now We Are Enemies, an account of the Battle of Bunker Hill, was published that same year. Since then, Fleming has published a long list of books about various events and figures of the Revolutionary era. He has also written about other periods of American history, and has written over a dozen well-received novels set against various historical backgrounds. He said, "I never wanted to be an Irish-American writer, my whole idea was to get across that bridge and be an American writer.[1] Immersing himself in American history, and writing books on Colonial families and military men, helped him build such a bridge. Besides his well-received early novels, with stories set in the waning days of Irish-American political power, Fleming has published acclaimed biographies of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and Benjamin Franklin. He has written extensively on the American Revolution and both world wars. Seven of his novels trace the fortunes of one family in particular, the Stapletons, through different historical periods: "These novels are my exemplars of how people are hammered by history, tortured by it, absorbed by it. They say a lot about the American experience." Starting with the Revolution, Fleming says, Americans have been torn by what he calls "the great dichotomy:" the clash between American ideals and brutal political and economic realities. It was a conflict he saw firsthand as a sailor aboard the warship USS Topeka in the Pacific at the close of World War II, and later while he was conducting research for a history of the United States Military Academy at West Point. He lived at West Point from 1964 to 1968,) and interviewed officers and their families as the controversy over America's involvement in the Vietnam War intensified. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Fleming_(historian)
Views: 213 Way Back
Christopher Hitchens on Thomas Jefferson: Influence on the Revolution & Louisiana Purchase (2006)
 
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Jefferson served as a delegate to the Second Continental Congress beginning in June 1775, soon after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War. About the book: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&tag=tra0c7-20&linkCode=ur2&linkId=6f32a530e58f9a42591430340e05064a&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=books&keywords=hitchens%20jefferson He didn't know many people in the congress, but sought out John Adams who, along with his cousin Samuel, had emerged as a leader of the convention. Jefferson and Adams established a friendship that would last the rest of their lives; it led to the drafting of Jefferson to write the declaration of independence. When Congress began considering a resolution of independence in June 1776, Adams ensured that Jefferson was appointed to the five-man committee to write a declaration in support of the resolution.[30] After discussing the general outline for the document, the committee decided that Jefferson would write the first draft.[31] The committee in general, and Jefferson in particular, thought Adams should write the document. Adams persuaded the committee to choose Jefferson, who was reluctant to take the assignment, and promised to consult with the younger man. Over the next seventeen days, Jefferson had limited time for writing and finished the draft quickly.[32] Consulting with other committee members, Jefferson also drew on his own proposed draft of the Virginia Constitution, George Mason's draft of the Virginia Declaration of Rights, and other sources. The other committee members made some changes. Most notably Jefferson had written, "We hold these truths to be sacred and un-deniable..." Franklin changed it to, "We hold these truths to be self-evident."[33] A final draft was presented to the Congress on June 28, 1776. The title of the document was "A Declaration by the Representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress assembled."[34] Jefferson viewed the Independence of the American people from the mother country Britain as breaking away from "parent stock", and that the War of Independence from Britain was a natural outcome of being separated by the Atlantic Ocean.[35] Jefferson viewed English colonists were compelled to rely on "common sense" and rediscover the "laws of nature".[35] According to Jefferson, the Independence of the original British colonies was in a historical succession following a similar pattern when the Saxons colonized Britain and left their mother country Europe hundreds of years earlier.[35] After voting in favor of the resolution of independence on July 2, Congress turned its attention to the declaration. Over three days of debate, Congress made changes and deleted nearly a fourth of the text, most notably a passage critical of the slave trade.[36] While Jefferson resented the changes, he did not speak publicly about the revisions. On July 4, 1776, the Congress ratified the Declaration of Independence and the delegates signed the document. The Declaration would eventually be considered one of Jefferson's major achievements; his preamble has been considered an enduring statement of human rights.[36] All men are created equal has been called "one of the best-known sentences in the English language",[37] containing "the most potent and consequential words in American history".[38] The passage came to represent a moral standard to which the United States should strive. This view was notably promoted by Abraham Lincoln, who based his philosophy on it, and argued for the Declaration as a statement of principles through which the United States Constitution should be interpreted.[39] In 1803, in the midst of the Napoleonic wars between France and Britain, Thomas Jefferson authorized the Louisiana Purchase, a major land acquisition from France that doubled the size of the United States. Most of France's wealth in the New World had come from its sugar plantations on Saint-Domingue and Guadeloupe in the Caribbean, but production had fallen after a slave uprising. After sending more than 20,000 troops to try to regain the colony in 1802, France withdrew its 7,000 surviving troops in late 1803, shortly before Haiti declared independence.[95] Having lost the revenue potential of Haiti while escalating his wars against the rest of Europe, Napoleon gave up on an empire in North America and used the purchase money to help finance France's war campaign on its home front.[96][95] Though France was removed as a threat to the United States, Jefferson refused to recognize the new republic of Haiti, the second in the Western Hemisphere, and imposed an arms and trade embargo against it. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_jefferson
Views: 207449 The Film Archives
Thomas Jefferson - Author of The Declaration of Indepence & 3rd U.S. President | Mini Bio | BIO
 
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Watch a short video biography of Thomas Jefferson, the draftsman of the Declaration of Independence and the third president of the United States. #Biography Subscribe for more Biography: http://aetv.us/2AsWMPH Delve deeper into Biography on our site: http://www.biography.com Follow Biography for more surprising stories from fascinating lives: Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/Biography Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/biography Twitter - https://twitter.com/biography Biography.com captures the most gripping, surprising, and fascinating stories about famous people: The biggest break. The defining opportunity. The most shattering failure. The unexpected connection. The decision that changed everything. With over 7,000 biographies and daily features that highlight newsworthy and compelling points-of-view, we are the digital source for true stories about people that matter. Thomas Jefferson - Author of The Declaration of Indepence & 3rd U.S. President | Mini Bio | BIO https://www.youtube.com/user/BiographyChannel
Views: 140879 Biography
Funny Capital One TV Commercial, "Louisiana"
 
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Thomas Jefferson's colleagues are in disarray as they await Napoleon's approval of the Louisiana Purchase. But, all is well when Jefferson receives an Instant Purchase Notification from Capital One letting him know the $15 million transaction was complete. Capital One claims that with Instant Purchase Notifications, customers will never miss a purchase whether it's small, large or ...very large, and the company thinks that technology this helpful could make history. Subscribe to our channel for more updates http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=everytvcommercials
Views: 9520 Every TV Commercials
Louisiana Purchase - Thomas Jefferson Achievements - One Minute History
 
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1762 - In the aftermath of the French and Indian War, France loses the Louisiana Territory to Spain. When Spain returns the land to France in an 1801 treaty, Americans worry about what the aggressive Napoleon Bonaparte might do with it. In response, President Thomas Jefferson orders U.S. Minister Robert Livingston to negotiate the purchase of the strategic port of New Orleans from the French. When France offers to sell the entire Louisiana Territory instead, Jefferson moves swiftly to close the deal. On May 2, 1803, the United States signs a treaty with France, acquiring the Louisiana Territory for 15 million dollars. The land deal doubles the size of the United States, adding 828 million square miles to its territory. At a cost of less than three cents per acre, the Louisiana Purchase becomes one of Thomas Jefferson’s most notable achievements as President of the United States. Music: Divider by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://chriszabriskie.com/divider/ Artist: http://chriszabriskie.com/ Read by Estela Mercado - https://www.instagram.com/estelamercado.pnessa ... Please feel free to reach out to us at [email protected] WEBSITE - https://www.oneminutehistory.com PATREON - https://www.patreon.com/oneminutehistory FACEBOOK - https://www.facebook.com/oneminutehistory INSTAGRAM - https://www.instagram.com/oneminutehistory TWITTER - https://www.twitter.com/1minhistory
Views: 5422 One Minute History
The Louisiana Purchase and the Destiny of America: A Fascinating Tale
 
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The Louisiana Purchase Treaty was signed on April 30 by Robert Livingston, James Monroe, and Barbé Marbois in Paris. Jefferson announced the treaty to the American people on July 4. After the signing of the Louisiana Purchase agreement in 1803, Livingston made this famous statement, "We have lived long, but this is the noblest work of our whole lives... From this day the United States take their place among the powers of the first rank."[39] The United States Senate advised and consented to ratification of the treaty with a vote of twenty-four to seven on October 20. The Senators who voted against the treaty were: Simeon Olcott and William Plumer of New Hampshire, William Wells and Samuel White of Delaware, James Hillhouse and Uriah Tracy of Connecticut, and Timothy Pickering of Massachusetts. On the following day, October 21, 1803, the Senate authorized Jefferson to take possession of the territory and establish a temporary military government. In legislation enacted on October 31, Congress made temporary provisions for local civil government to continue as it had under French and Spanish rule and authorized the President to use military forces to maintain order. Plans were also set forth for several missions to explore and chart the territory, the most famous being the Lewis and Clark Expedition.[40] A timeline of legislation can be found at the Library of Congress: American Memory:The Louisiana Purchase Legislative Timeline--1803-1804. The American government used $3 million in gold as a down payment, and issued bonds for the balance to pay France for the purchase. Earlier that year, Francis Baring and Company of London had become the U.S. government's official banking agent in London. Because of this favored position, the U.S. asked the Baring firm to handle the transaction. Francis Baring's son Alexander was in Paris at the time and helped in the negotiations.[50] Another Baring advantage was a close relationship with Hope and Company of Amsterdam. The two banking houses worked together to facilitate and underwrite the Purchase. Because Napoleon wanted to receive his money as quickly as possible, the two firms received the American bonds and shipped the gold to France.[50] Napoleon used the money to finance his planned invasion of England, which never took place. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louisiana_Purchase
Views: 1147 The Film Archives
CAROL BRUCE - Louisiana Purchase (1940)
 
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"Louisiana Purchase" written by Irving Berlin in 1940. Carol Bruce (November 15, 1919 -- October 9, 2007) was an American band singer, Broadway star, and film and television actress. Bruce was born Shirley Levy in Great Neck, New York, the daughter of Beatrice and Harry Levy. She began her career as a singer in the late 1930s with Larry Clinton and his band. A graduate of Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn, New York, she made her Broadway debut in Louisiana Purchase," with songs by Irving Berlin who discovered her at a nightclub in Newark, New Jersey. She was the first actress to play the role of Julie in a Broadway production of Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II's Show Boat since the 1932 Broadway revival. Bruce played the role onstage in 1946 and garnered favorable comparisons to Helen Morgan, who had originated the role onstage in 1927 and repeated it in both the 1932 revival and the 1936 film, but had died prematurely in 1941. After a long career as a singer and in films, Bruce is probably best-remembered for her recurring role as the domineering and meddlesome "Mama Carlson" (mother of the station manager played by Gordon Jump) on CBS' WKRP in Cincinnati. Sylvia Sidney played Mr. Carlson's mother in the Pilot episode. Her only marriage (to Milton Nathanson, which ended in divorce) produced a daughter, Julie, an actress, singer and playwright who married jazz guitarist Larry Coryell. Bruce's grandchildren, Murali Coryell and Julian Coryell, are both musicians as well. Bruce died from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at the Motion Picture & Television Country House and Hospital in Woodland Hills, California, a month before her 88th birthday. She was also survived by her sister and two great-grandsons.
Views: 2563 ramoburg
The Louisiana Purchase Documentary
 
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Check out my new gaming channel right here: http://www.youtube.com/user/Hirachnik?feature=g-user-u Documentary a friend and I did about the Louisiana purchase. I do most of the voices.
Views: 99783 The Oddball Minute
Who did we buy the Louisiana Purchase from
 
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Who did we buy the Louisiana Purchase from - Find out more explanation for : 'Who did we buy the Louisiana Purchase from' only from this channel. Information Source: google
Views: 0 moibrad4c
What if Napoleon Never Rose To Power?
 
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Napoleon has been riddled down to a caricature in modern media, but we often forget our entire modern life is directly from his actions and the aftermath of his wars. What if Napoleon never actually came to power? Here is one alternate scenario. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/alternatehistoryhub/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/AltHistoryHub End Credit Song By 'Trash Hawk'. Check out his channel! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuwahe7ErTNMqilUNM-hA0g Music by Sam Kuzel and Cadre Crimson: https://soundcloud.com/samkuzel https://soundcloud.com/cadrecrimson
Views: 2263115 AlternateHistoryHub
Louisiana Purchase
 
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The Louisiana Purchase (French: Vente de la Louisiane "Sale of Louisiana") was the acquisition by the United States of America in 1803 of 828,000 square miles (2,144,000 square kilometers or 529,920,000 acres) of France's claim to the territory of Louisiana. The U.S. paid 50 million francs ($11,250,000) plus cancellation of debts worth 18 million francs ($3,750,000), a total sum of 15 million dollars (around 4 cents per acre), for the Louisiana territory ($236 million in 2013 dollars, less than 42 cents per acre). The Louisiana territory encompassed all or part of 15 present U.S. states and two Canadian provinces. The land purchased contained all of present-day Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska; parts of Minnesota that were west of the Mississippi River; most of North Dakota; most of South Dakota; northeastern New Mexico; northern Texas; the portions of Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado east of the Continental Divide; Louisiana west of the Mississippi River, including the city of New Orleans; and small portions of land that would eventually become part of the Canadian provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan. France controlled this vast area from 1699 until 1762, the year it gave the territory to its ally Spain. Under Napoleon Bonaparte, France took back the territory in 1800 in the hope of building an empire in North America. A slave revolt in Haiti and an impending war with Britain, however, led France to abandon these plans and sell the entire territory to the United States, which had originally intended only to seek the purchase of New Orleans and its adjacent lands. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 472 Audiopedia
The Louisiana Purchase
 
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** WATCH IN HD! LOOKS WAY BETTER :) ** This is a video I created for American History. It is about the purchase of Louisiana. Made with Xtranormal. Mode videos to be uploaded soon? IDK?
Views: 65463 roombafan56001
What Year Was The Louisiana Purchase?
 
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Louisiana purchase wikipedia the louisiana was acquisition of territory by united states from before 1803, had been under spanish control for forty years. This vision was threatened, louisiana purchase and lewis & clark timeline. Louisiana purchase, 1803 (primary documents of american history westward expansion the louisiana purchase [ushistory]. Encyclopedia louisiana purchase changed the world history duckstersdefine at dictionary. It would take more than 150 years and hundreds of lopsided treaties to indian title the louisiana territory, tracked here from 1804 through 2012, yielded 3 mar 2017 purchase offered america what native americans had known about for a variety natural formations (waterfalls, get information, facts, pictures at encyclopedia. A history of the nineteenth century, year by edwin emerson ratification louisiana purchase treaty senate on october 20, that stretched from as far east alabama into what is now state montana jefferson's plans for nation depended upon western expansion and access to international markets american farm products. The history of the louisiana purchase thoughtco. Of the louisiana purchase became a major issue in later years and part of definition, treaty signed with france 1803 by which u. Jefferson and the louisiana purchase bill of rights institute. Louisiana purchase facts & summary history. Louisiana purchase and lewis & clark timeline of important dates. Louisiana purchase concluded apr 30, 1803 history. Her seizing on what jefferson later called 'a fugitive occurrence,' monroe and louisiana purchase overview of the purchase, acquisition territory had been object old world interest for many years before 1803. Louisiana purchase, thomas jefferson, lewis and clark the louisiana purchase encompassed 530,000,000 acres of territory in north america that united states purchased from france 1803 for $15 million (1803) was a land deal between jefferson wrote, 'spain might have retained [new orleans] quietly years. Learn more about what happened today on history. While jefferson did his best to follow what he believed was proper constitutional it must also be remembered that comprised the louisiana territory frequently when united states contacted france about purchase of new who president completed in year completedwhat Louisiana facts & summary history. Louisiana purchase wikipedia. Louisiana purchase facts, information, pictures. Things you may not know about the louisiana purchase history office of historian department statethomas jefferson's monticellohistory, facts, & map how much did actually cost? . With 11 men, heading west with the nucleus of what will become corps discovery senate ratified louisiana purchase treaty in october 1803. For land, france engaged the british in seven years' war (1754 1763; The louisiana purchase, made 200 years ago this month, nearly doubled size of what kind world were jefferson and napolonliving working in? . Missouri territory was the name given to what left of lou
Views: 26 Question Bank
How Did The Purchase Of The Louisiana Territory Affect The Size Of The United States?
 
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As the united states had expanded westward, navigation of mississippi river and access to port new orleans become critical louisiana purchase doubled size states, & caused a lot controversy for president thomas jefferson. What natural landform creates the western boundary of louisiana 30 seconds. The biggest effect the louisiana purchase had on united states was change in size of country. History louisiana purchase facts, information, pictures simple english wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. How did the louisiana purchase change united states? Quora. What country did we buy the size of military. What was known as louisiana territory stretched from the mississippi river in east to rocky mountains west and gulf of when thomas jefferson purchased france, he altered shape a nation course history. The entire louisiana territory more than 800,000 acres from to the rockies and beyond for $15 millionHow did purchase affect united states. Jefferson and the louisiana purchase bill of rights institute. 15 describes the impact of the louisiana purchase on the u. Question 6 when did the united states of america purchase territory louisiana? 1703. Louisiana purchase office of the historian. The history of the louisiana purchase thoughtcothomas jefferson's monticello. The louisiana purchase nearly doubled the size of united states and cost about four cents an acre was a breathtaking bargain. Why did the americans want louisiana territory? 30 seconds. How did the louisiana purchase effect geography of louisiana? It tripled size u. How did the louisiana purchase affect size of us. S 1 feb 2013 this year marks 210 years since the louisiana purchase, which added 828,000 square miles to territory of united states, doubling its size. How did the napoleonic wars (the war between france and britain) affect u. He bought the louisiana territory from france, which was being led by napoleon bonaparte at time, for usd. The louisiana purchase president thomas jefferson wrote this prediction in an april 1802 letter to pierre samuel du pont amid reports that spain would retrocede france the vast territory of. How the louisiana purchase changed world. He believed that the french control would jeopardize american trade on mississippi river. That's because there were some very negative periods for the u. Perhaps the biggest benefit to trip, though, was that united states government finally had a grasp on what exactly it purchased. Louisiana purchase facts & summary history. In one simple transaction, he doubled the size of unitedwithout that decision, america would likely be a much smaller and less wealthy nation today how money did jefferson suggest his negotiators offer for new orleans florida territory. How d
Views: 59 Hadassah Hartman
louisiana purchase
 
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louisiana purchase history channel louisiana purchase for kids louisiana purchase treaty louisiana purchase kitchen louisiana purchase treaty
Views: 434 ucanhali123
Roundtable Discussion - The Louisiana Purchase
 
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Featuring prominent historians, this roundtable discussion examines the impact the Louisiana Purchase had on the United States.
Views: 4677 sabbfann
Westward Expansion: Crash Course US History #24
 
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In which John Green teaches you about the Wild, Wild, West, which as it turns out, wasn't as wild as it seemed in the movies. When we think of the western expansion of the United States in the 19th century, we're conditioned to imagine the loner. The self-reliant, unattached cowpoke roaming the prairie in search of wandering calves, or the half-addled prospector who has broken from reality thanks to the solitude of his single-minded quest for gold dust. While there may be a grain of truth to these classic Hollywood stereotypes, it isn't a very big grain of truth. Many of the pioneers who settled the west were family groups. Many were immigrants. Many were major corporations. The big losers in the westward migration were Native Americans, who were killed or moved onto reservations. Not cool, American pioneers. Support CrashCourse on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Hey teachers and students - Check out CommonLit's free collection of reading passages and curriculum resources to learn more about the events of this episode. America’s Westward expansion was fueled by both Manifest Destiny and a desire to grow the nation and its resources — though at a cost: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/manifest-destiny As Americans continued to stream West on the name of Manifest Destiny, American Indians saw their lives changed forever as they moved from practising resistance to lives on reservations: https://www.commonlit.org/texts/from-resistance-to-reservations
Views: 1921933 CrashCourse
Biography of Thomas Jefferson for Kids: Meet the American President - FreeSchool
 
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https://patreon.com/freeschool - Help support more content like this! Have you ever wanted to know more information about Thomas Jefferson? You probably know that Thomas Jefferson wrote the Declaration of Independence. But did you know that the third President of the United States was also an ambassador, the first Secretary of State, and the second Vice President? Thomas Jefferson made the Louisiana Purchase and commissioned the Lewis and Clark Expedition, and more! Come learn more about Thomas Jefferson plus a bit about the Revolutionary War and the founding of the United States, plus cool history facts in this child-friendly biography. Like this video if you want to see more BIOGRAPHIES! Subscribe to FreeSchool: https://www.youtube.com/user/watchfreeschool?sub_confirmation=1 Visit us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/watchFreeSchool Check our our companion channel, FreeSchool Mom! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTcEtHRQhqiCZIIb77LyDmA And our NEW channel for little ones, FreeSchool Early Birds! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3OV62x86XHwaqsxLsuy8dA Music: Jaunty Gumption - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Views: 136973 Free School
THE LOUISIANA PURCHASE--CREATING AN EMPIRE FOR LIBERTY
 
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All credit for this video goes to HISTORY.COM, A&E, and LIONSGATE. It is posted here solely for the educational purposes of my students.
Views: 64 Bobblehead George
The Louisiana Territory
 
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Guiding Questions Why did the US Purchase the Louisiana Territory? Who was President of the United States at the Louisiana Purchase? How much did we spend (per acre)? What does this do to the size of the United States? Who were Lewis & Clark? What role did Sacagawea play in their expedition to explore the Louisiana Territory?
Views: 27 Lance Mosier
The Louisiana Purchase by Shmoop
 
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http://www.shmoop.com/louisiana-purchase-lewis-clark/ This video discusses the Louisiana Purchase. From the Haitian Revolution that led to it to the Civil War it led to, the Louisiana Purchase played a bigger role in the formation of America today than many people think. Don’t even get us started on its effect on the question of slavery in early 19th century America. What did this purchase cost, anyway?
Views: 16815 Shmoop
How Much Did We Buy The Louisiana Purchase For?
 
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In summing up the feelings of his cohorts, former congressman fisher ames wrote, we are to give money which have too little for land already much. The deal encompassed some 800,000 square miles, which equates to approximately 512,000,000 acres. The louisiana purchase jefferson's constitutional gamble. When did lewis and clark many of those in the federalist party (the opposing to jefferson's democratic republicans) believed that he would have objected on constitutional grounds if any them had tried do same thing. Jefferson agreed that the u. The western border with spain was much disputed 30 jul 2015 10. Sthe purchase doubled the size of united states, greatly strengthened he went on to speculate that 'it would not perhaps be very long before some circumstance might arise which make cession it us price something more worth her. Today the land in louisiana purchase is worth significantly more. The pinckney treaty of 1795 when thomas jefferson purchased the louisiana territory from france, he altered shape a nation and course history. Spain had ceded the louisiana territory to france, and napoleon, in turn, offloaded it american diplomats paris after 30 apr 2013 on anniversary of purchase, take a look behind scenes historic real estate deal. The french controlled this region from 1699 until 1762 when it became spanish property because france gave to spain as a present, since they were allies. Louisiana purchase facts, information, pictures. Constitution did not contain explicit 1 mar 2017 it's a familiar chapter in our history, part of the triumphant narrative westward expansion 1803, united states bought massive chunk north america, and we got it for song. The louisiana purchase occurred during the term of third president united states, thomas jefferson. By that time, jefferson and his supporters faced an october 31, 1803 deadline to ratify the treaty or lose purchase How much did louisiana actually cost? . Only one with the louisiana purchase in 1803, united states purchased approximately 828,000,000 square miles of territory from france, thereby doubling size young republic. Minister to france, try and buy the land from french emperor 23 aug 2017 secondly, many federalists worried that u. How much did the louisiana purchase actually cost? . How the louisiana purchase changed world define at dictionary 3 of most lucrative land deals in history investopedia2 flashcards controversy ancestralfindings canada and shannon selin. '3jefferson's vision of obtaining territory from spain was altered by the prospect of having the much more powerful summary and definition the 1803 louisiana purchase was a massive western region of north america, consisting
Views: 48 Hadassah Hartman
Who asked Lewis and Clark to explore the Louisiana Purchase
 
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Who asked Lewis and Clark to explore the Louisiana Purchase - Find out more explanation for : 'Who asked Lewis and Clark to explore the Louisiana Purchase' only from this channel. Information Source: google
Brilliant Opening to the Irving Berlin Musical, "Louisiana Purchase" (1941)
 
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Louisiana Purchase (1941 - Paramount) In one of the finest openings to a screen musical, Emory Parnell hosts the first of two Irving Berlin songs; "Lawyer's Letter," and "It's New to Us." Parnell's secretary is played by Iris Meredith, who starred in many B-Westerns. Among the many "Louisiana Belles" from the second number are Karin Booth and Barbara Britton. The titles for these two numbers come from the listing on IMDB; however on the Internet Broadway DB, the corresponding titles for the stage version are listed as, "The Letter," and "Apologia." I assume these reference the same two songs. This Bob Hope film is available on a double-bill DVD, alongside "Never Say Die."
Views: 7095 JB1912JB
Liberty's Kids 127 - The New Frontier
 
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In the Ohio territory, Shawnee Chief Cornstalk and his people are caught between the Americans and the British, with tragic results (11/77). In Philadelphia, inflation makes life difficult for working people and leads to the “Fort Wilson” riot (10/79). Sarah is reunited with her father in Ohio. After witnessing the cruel treatment of Cornstalk, she has had enough of the violence in the New World and decides to return to England. James takes on an angry mob as he reports on the repercussions of inflation.
Views: 176122 Liberty's Kids
07) Louisiana Purchase
 
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The coin featured in this episode play a significant role in the Louisiana Purchase and how the modern United States was formed. Who knew a shipwreck from a hurricane could influence so many decisions.
Views: 41 George Manz Coins
It Started Here: Early Arkansas and The Louisiana Purchase
 
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"It Started Here: Early Arkansas and The Louisiana Purchase", chronicles the people and land of Arkansas, between the signing of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, leading up to Arkansas statehood in 1836.
Views: 9309 AETN
School house Rock - Elbow Room.flv
 
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Lewis & Clark Lesson Plan
Views: 117634 kingslandalan
Mystery Surrounds Death of Explorer Meriwether Lewis 200 Years Later
 
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American explorer Meriwether Lewis is best known for his efforts in the early 1800s to chart the Louisiana Purchase territory. His expedition with William Clark paved the way for the westward expansion of the United States. After the journey, President Thomas Jefferson appointed Lewis as Governor of the Louisiana Territory. While on a trip from St. Louis to Washington D.C. in 1809, Lewis died under circumstances that, to this day some 200 years later, remain a mystery. VOA's Kane Farabaugh has more from Tennessee.
Views: 8590 VOA News
Empress of Washitaw ( Stolen Louisiana Purchase land )
 
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this video is about the Empress of the Washitaw ( land formaly known as the louisiana purchase ). its been a lot of deception that's been perpetuated for far too long, its time we start going within ourselves to figure out whats been done to us. no matter the complexion of your skin, we all been lied too... united we stand divided we all fall...
Views: 8262 DEDRE MO
Louisiana Purchase Exposition Issue 1904, US stamps
 
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http://www.usapostagestamps.com/ The Louisiana Purchase Exposition Issue publicized the 1904 World's Fair, held in St. Louis, Missouri. Five single-color stamps in values of 1-cent, 2-cent, 3-cent, 5-cent, and 10-cent inscribed "Commemorative Series of 1904" were issued in conjunction with the fair's opening on April 30, 1904. Three stamps feature men who were intimately involved in the Louisiana Purchase (1803): U.S. Ambassador to France Robert Livingston, Secretary of State James Monroe, and President Thomas Jefferson. The 1-cent stamp shows a map of the Louisiana Purchase, the first map to appear on a U.S. stamp. The subject of the 5-cent stamp depicts William McKinley, who had nothing to do with the Louisiana Purchase. He earned his place on the stamp because he was the president who signed the legislation giving federal sanction to the Exposition. This stamp essentially became a memorial to McKinley, who was assassinated in 1901.
Views: 753 usphilately
Haitian Revolutions: Crash Course World History #30
 
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Ideas like liberty, freedom, and self-determination were hot stuff in the late 18th century, as evidenced by our recent revolutionary videos. Although freedom was breaking out all over, many of the societies that were touting these ideas relied on slave labor. Few places in the world relied so heavily on slave labor as Saint-Domingue, France's most profitable colony. Slaves made up nearly 90% of Saint-Domingue's population, and in 1789 they couldn't help but hear about the revolution underway in France. All the talk of liberty, equality, and fraternity sounds pretty good to a person in bondage, and so the slaves rebelled. This led to not one but two revolutions, and ended up with France, the rebels, Britain, and Spain all fighting in the territory. Spoiler alert: the slaves won. So how did the slaves of what would become Haiti throw off the yoke of one of the world's great empires? John Green tells how they did it, and what it has meant in Haiti and in the rest of the world. Crash Course World History is now available on DVD! http://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-world-history-the-complete-series-dvd-set Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @raoulmeyer @crashcoursestan @saysdanica @thoughtbubbler Like us! ‪http://www.facebook.com/youtubecrashcourse Follow us again! ‪http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse
Views: 2138304 CrashCourse