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Interpreting Research
 
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Elisabet Tiselius, conference interpreter and PhD student in interpreting studies, gives an overview of interpreting research. She talks about the origins of research in interpreting, shows some models used to identify and map interpreting and shares some research secrets. For more information and list of references in the speech go to A WORD IN YOUR EAR: http://lourdesderioja.com/
Views: 2146 lourdes De Rioja
Threats to Validity: What You Should Know to Interpret Research Findings
 
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Presented by Fran Featherston, Ph.D. Our lives are full of findings from research results. Not all of the claims they make are valid. Some studies use samples that are not representative. Other studies make claims when they have no comparison group. The question wording or even question order can bias survey results. How do you know when you can trust the research claims? What do you need to look for? This talk will give you tips to judge the research you read. Dr. Featherston looks at examples from the current news and discuss what you need to know to judge whether the research finding can be trusted. She also discusses the threats to validity for each study and whether the research meets the standard of reproducibility. That is, could another researcher possibly reproduce this finding? Fran Featherston is retired from the U.S. federal government where she worked 27 years as a researcher at the National Science Foundation (10 years) and the Governmental Accountability Office (17 years). Her areas of expertise are survey research, research design, and designing methods that are user friendly. She also worked for the State of Washington’s court systems so that she has experienced the challenges of designing high quality research for all three branches of government.
Views: 6224 NCASVideo
Research Methodology Lecture 30 - Interpretation of Results and Discussion - Dr D S Janbandhu
 
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Research Methodology Lecture 30 - Dr D S Janbandhu Dual Language - English and Marathi School of Architecture, Science and Technology (AST), Yashwantrao Chavan Maharashtra Open University (YCMOU), Nashik - 422222, Maharashtra, India Visit Us Here: https://www.facebook.com/ycmouast/
Views: 2064 YCMOU
Survey Research Methods Interpreting & Reporting Results
 
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On Tuesday, December 4, 2012, at 2 p.m. ET, The TASA Group, Inc., in conjunction with consulting statistician Dr. Jack B. ReVelle, presented a free, one-hour, interactive webinar, Survey Research Methods: Interpreting & Reporting Results, for all legal professionals. Survey Research Methods was the third installment of the three-part webinar series, Statistical Tools for Attorneys in Litigation. Part 1, “Introduction to Data,” and Part 2, “The Basic Tools,’ were presented in the Spring of 2012. Part 3, “Survey Research Methods,” is composed of four phases: “Planning and Designing a Survey,” “Developing Survey Instruments,” “Collecting and Processing Data,” and “Interpreting and Reporting Results.” During this program, "Interpreting & Reporting Results," the presenter will covered: * Analyzing the Results * Interpreting Statistics * Reporting the Information About the Expert Jack B. ReVelle, Ph.D., is a consulting statistician with a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering and Management from Oklahoma State University. Dr. ReVelle provides his technical assistance in both quality and industrial engineering to attorneys involved in litigation.
Views: 925 The TASA Group, Inc
Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide
 
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The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *it surprises you; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have read about something similar in reports, e.g. scientific articles; *it reminds you of a theory or a concept; *or for some other reason that you think is relevant. You can use preconceived theories and concepts, be open-minded, aim for a description of things that are superficial, or aim for a conceptualization of underlying patterns. It is all up to you. It is your study and your choice of methodology. You are the interpreter and these phenomena are highlighted because you consider them important. Just make sure that you tell your reader about your methodology, under the heading Method. Be unbiased, stay close to the data, i.e. the transcripts, and do not hesitate to code plenty of phenomena. You can have lots of codes, even hundreds. STEP 3, decide which codes are the most important, and create categories by bringing several codes together 3.1. Go through all the codes created in the previous step. Read them, with a pen in your hand. 3.2. You can create new codes by combining two or more codes. 3.3. You do not have to use all the codes that you created in the previous step. 3.4. In fact, many of these initial codes can now be dropped. 3.5. Keep the codes that you think are important and group them together in the way you want. 3.6. Create categories. (You can call them themes if you want.) 3.7. The categories do not have to be of the same type. They can be about objects, processes, differences, or whatever. 3.8. Be unbiased, creative and open-minded. 3.9. Your work now, compared to the previous steps, is on a more general, abstract level. 3.10. You are conceptualizing your data. STEP 4, label categories and decide which are the most relevant and how they are connected to each other 4.1. Label the categories. Here are some examples: Adaptation (Category) Updating rulebook (sub-category) Changing schedule (sub-category) New routines (sub-category) Seeking information (Category) Talking to colleagues (sub-category) Reading journals (sub-category) Attending meetings (sub-category) Problem solving (Category) Locate and fix problems fast (sub-category) Quick alarm systems (sub-category) 4.2. Describe the connections between them. 4.3. The categories and the connections are the main result of your study. It is new knowledge about the world, from the perspective of the participants in your study. STEP 5, some options 5.1. Decide if there is a hierarchy among the categories. 5.2. Decide if one category is more important than the other. 5.3. Draw a figure to summarize your results. STEP 6, write up your results 6.1. Under the heading Results, describe the categories and how they are connected. Use a neutral voice, and do not interpret your results. 6.2. Under the heading Discussion, write out your interpretations and discuss your results. Interpret the results in light of, for example: *results from similar, previous studies published in relevant scientific journals; *theories or concepts from your field; *other relevant aspects. STEP 7 Ending remark This tutorial showed how to focus on segments in the transcripts and how to put codes together and create categories. However, it is important to remember that it is also OK not to divide the data into segments. Narrative analysis of interview transcripts, for example, does not rely on the fragmentation of the interview data. (Narrative analysis is not discussed in this tutorial.) Further, I have assumed that your task is to make sense of a lot of unstructured data, i.e. that you have qualitative data in the form of interview transcripts. However, remember that most of the things I have said in this tutorial are basic, and also apply to qualitative analysis in general. You can use the steps described in this tutorial to analyze: *notes from participatory observations; *documents; *web pages; *or other types of qualitative data. STEP 8 Suggested reading Alan Bryman's book: 'Social Research Methods' published by Oxford University Press. Steinar Kvale's and Svend Brinkmann's book 'InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing' published by SAGE. Good luck with your study. Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 629271 Kent Löfgren
Writing the Results Section for Research Papers
 
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The Results section of a scientific research paper represents the core findings of a study derived from the methods applied to gather and analyze information. It presents these findings in a logical sequence without bias or interpretation from the author, setting up the reader for later interpretation and evaluation in the Discussion section. This video explains what the purpose of the Results section is, what it includes, and how to structure and compose your study's findings in a research paper. Wordvice YouTube videos: "How to Write a Research Paper Introduction" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTC-5P1VFFU) "Which Verb Tenses to Use in a Research Paper" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcuL_IaRtXc) "How to Write an Abstract for a Research Paper" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMEnRBss6V4) "How to Write a Research Paper Title" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fl1q-I3bE0c) Wordvice Resources Page "Useful Phrases for Academic Writing" (https://wordvice.com/useful-phrases-for-writing-academic-papers/) "Common Transition Terms in Academic Paper" (https://wordvice.com/common-transition-terms-used-in-academic-papers/) "Active and Passive Voice in Research Papers" (https://wordvice.com/video-should-i-use-active-or-passive-voice-in-a-research-paper/) "100+ Verbs That Will Make Your Research Writing Amazing" (https://wordvice.com/recommended-verbs-for-research-writing/) "Tips for Paraphrasing in Research Papers" (https://wordvice.com/a-guide-to-paraphrasing-in-research-papers-apa-ama/) External Resources University of Minnesota. "Guidelines for Writing a Literature Review." (http://www.duluth.umn.edu/~hrallis/guides/researching/litreview.html) The UNC Writing Center. "Literature Reviews." (https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/literature-reviews/) Wordvice offers editing services in several languages and countries: ENGLISH: https://www.wordvice.com KOREA: https://www.essayreview.co.kr JAPAN: https://www.wordvice.jp CHINA: https://www.wordvice.cn TAIWAN: https://www.wordvice.com.tw TURKEY: https://www.wordvice.com.tr
Views: 437 Wordvice
Interpretation and Discussion in Research - Tubeducation
 
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The intention of creating this channel is to help new academicians and researchers to retain more information, understand concepts more rapidly and getting into academia more efficiently. If you have any ideas or suggestions that would make this Tubeducation more exciting and useful for all, please let us know. Thanks for your visit. Stay tuned!
Views: 158 Tubeducation
How Scientists Manipulate Research With P-Value
 
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Numbers don’t lie, right? Or are scientists intentionally using statistics to mislead us? Top 5 Things Wrong With Science ►►►►http://bit.ly/1pILTAB Sign Up For The TestTube Newsletter Here ►►►► http://bit.ly/1myXbFG Read More: The ASA's statement on p-values: context, process,and purpose http://amstat.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00031305.2016.1154108#aHR0cDovL2Ftc3RhdC50YW5kZm9ubGluZS5jb20vZG9pL3BkZi8xMC4xMDgwLzAwMDMxMzA1LjIwMTYuMTE1NDEwOEBAQDA= “Underpinning many published scientific conclusions is the concept of ‘statistical significance,’ typically assessed with an index called the p-value. While the p-value can be a useful statistical measure, it is commonly misused and misinterpreted.” Evolution of Reporting P Values in the Biomedical Literature, 1990-2015 http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2503172 “In this analysis of P values reported in MEDLINE abstracts and in PMC articles from 1990-2015...almost all abstracts and articles with P values reported statistically significant results, and, in a subgroup analysis, few articles included confidence intervals, Bayes factors, or effect sizes. Rather than reporting isolated P values, articles should include effect sizes and uncertainty metrics.” ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Lissette Padilla on Twitter https://twitter.com/lizzette DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq Sign Up For The TestTube Mailing List: http://dne.ws/1McUJdm
Views: 113062 Seeker
Episode 3-Limitations of Research and How to Interpret
 
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UpliftFit Nutrition Radio- Episode 3: In this episode- I dive into how to read and interpret research, evaluating the limitations, and what to look for and be aware of when reading research studies and their abstracts. Available on Itunes.
Views: 622 Lacey Dunn
Understanding the p-value - Statistics Help
 
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With Spanish subtitles. This video explains how to use the p-value to draw conclusions from statistical output. It includes the story of Helen, making sure that the choconutties she sells have sufficient peanuts. You might like to read my blog: http://learnandteachstatistics.wordpress.com
Views: 656308 Dr Nic's Maths and Stats
interpretation of research papers
 
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More info: https://goo.gl/BO3sXe?91957
Is Most Published Research Wrong?
 
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Mounting evidence suggests a lot of published research is false. Check out Audible: http://bit.ly/AudibleVe Support Veritasium on Patreon: http://bit.ly/VePatreon Patreon supporters: Bryan Baker, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Jason Buster, Saeed Alghamdi More information on this topic: http://wke.lt/w/s/z0wmO The Preregistration Challenge: https://cos.io/prereg/ Resources used in the making of this video: Why Most Published Research Findings Are False: http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.0020124 Trouble at the Lab: http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21588057-scientists-think-science-self-correcting-alarming-degree-it-not-trouble Science isn't broken: http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/science-isnt-broken/#part1 Visual effects by Gustavo Rosa
Views: 1643234 Veritasium
Things To Consider When Interpreting Research (inspired by Dr. Travis Beck)
 
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NOTE: Many of the thoughts and ideas for this presentation came from or have been inspired by Dr. Travis Beck, University of Oklahoma A great thought provoking and educational narrated powerpoint by Jeremy Loenneke PhD(c) on the importance of critically analyzing research findings. Sorry the audio is a bit droned, had to record the audio portion from a cell phone
Views: 4070 De Novo
Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: Data Analysis (Module 5)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what it is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to Module 5. Bradley EH, Curry LA, Devers K. Qualitative data analysis for health services research: Developing taxonomy, themes, and theory. Health Services Research, 2007; 42(4):1758-1772. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 132465 YaleUniversity
Tips for Reporting Research Results in Research Writing
 
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This video by http://www.bestessayservices.com will help you know how to represent your research results or findings in research paper writing. Follow us on twitter https://twitter.com/BestEssays247 or like us on facebook http://www.facebook.com/BestEssayServices. You can also visit our blog page to learn more on research paper writing.
Views: 3533 carescorptech
Significance and Meaning: Strategies for Analyzing and Interpreting Research Data
 
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Significance and Meaning introduces the concepts of correlation, causation, and probability.
Views: 1677 CHIP to CHIRP
What is action research?
 
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Here's a short description of action research. TRANSCRIPT: Teaching is a craft. It’s both an art and a science, which is why great teachers always experiment and make tons of mistakes. But how do you know what’s actually working? One option is action research. Here you can identify a question or problem, test out a strategy, gather data, and determine if it works. The end result is something dynamic, innovative, and tied directly to your classroom. Action research dissolves the barrier between participants and researchers. In other words, the teacher actively participates in the situation while conducting the research. There are many action research frameworks, but they generally follow a similar process: You start out in phase one, planning for research. Phase One: Planning for Research It starts with an inquiry process, where you define a specific research question. It needs to be something you can actually test. Next, you conduct a literature review to gain a deeper understanding of the related research. Finally, you move into the design process, where you determine your data methods, consider ethical issues, get required permissions, create deadlines and set up systems. This is where you engage in multiple cycles of experimentation and data collection. Your data collection might include qualitative data, like observations, artifacts, and interviews or quantitative data like rubric scores, surveys, or achievement data. Phase Three: Analysis You will often start by organizing data with charts or graphs and looking for trends. You might also discuss it with peers, free write in a journal, or create a cluster map before eventually writing out your results. Phase Four: Conclusion This is often where you share your research with the world and reflect on your own practice. This will ultimately lead to new questions . . . and the cycle will continue again as you refine your craft as a better, more creative teacher.
Views: 74082 John Spencer
Media Research : Statistics or Data Analysis and Interpretation
 
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This Lecture talks about Statistics or Data Analysis and Interpretation
Views: 1732 Cec Ugc
Quarterly Results Review with Interpretation by SMC Research Expert Mr. Dinesh Joshi
 
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Mr. Dinesh Joshi(Sr. Research Analyst,Equity(Fundamental)) giving review with interpretation on "Quarterly Results of HCLTech, DrReddy, Maruti Suzuki and YesBank.
Views: 122 SMC GLOBAL
The Clinical Genome Conference 2014 | Impact on Research and Interpretation of Results
 
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An-Dinh Nguyen interviews Valerie A. Schneider of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), NIH on April 4, 2014. Dr. Schneider will be a speaker at TCGC: The Clinical Genome Conference, June 10-12, 2014 in San Francisco, CA. Topics include updates to the human reference genome assembly, the Genome Reference Consortium (GRC), the relationship of the assembly to annotation and genome browsers, new assembly features and their potential impact on clinical analyses and interpretation of results.
ROC Curves and Area Under the Curve (AUC) Explained
 
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Transcript and screenshots: http://dataschool.io/roc-curves-and-auc-explained/ Visualization: http://www.navan.name/roc/ Research paper: http://people.inf.elte.hu/kiss/13dwhdm/roc.pdf An ROC curve is the most commonly used way to visualize the performance of a binary classifier, and AUC is (arguably) the best way to summarize its performance in a single number. As such, gaining a deep understanding of ROC curves and AUC is beneficial for data scientists, machine learning practitioners, and medical researchers (among others). == LET'S CONNECT! == Blog: http://www.dataschool.io Newsletter: http://www.dataschool.io/subscribe/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/justmarkham GitHub: https://github.com/justmarkham
Views: 226691 Data School
Research Skills and Methodology, Data Interpretation
 
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Research Skills and Methodology, Data Interpretation
Research Methodology, Data Analysis & Interpretation
 
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Research Methodology, Data Analysis & Interpretation- 073
How to support Research with Theoretical and Conceptual Frameworks
 
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Supporting Research with Theory I was asked: “how do you support your study relationship based on a theoretical or conceptual framework?” This video gets you to think about … 1) Is your question about a particular theory? 2) Is theory used to justify your question? 3) Is theory used to organize your findings? 4) Is your research about generating a new theory? 5) Is theory useful to explain the context or researcher stance? 6) Is a conceptual framework needed? Examples: Killam, L. A, & Carter, L. M. (2010). Challenges to the student nurse on clinical placement in the rural setting: A review of the literature. Rural and Remote Health, 10(online), 1523. http://www.rrh.org.au/articles/subviewnew.asp?ArticleID=1523 Killam, L. A., & Heerschap, C. (2012). Challenges to student learning in the clinical setting: A qualitative descriptive study. Nurse Education Today. doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2012.10.008 http://www.nurseeducationtoday.com/article/S0260-6917(12)00360-7/abstract Killam, L. A., Montgomery, P., Raymond, J. M., Mossey, S., Timmermans, K. E., & Binette, J. (2012). Unsafe clinical practices as perceived by final year baccalaureate nursing students: Q methodology. BMC Nursing. doi: 10.1186/1472-6955-11-26 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6955/11/26 Related Links: http://libguides.usc.edu/content.php?pid=83009&sid=618409 http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/research_and_nursing_theories.html Further Reading: http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/48274_ch_3.pdf http://youstudynursing.com/ Research eBook on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1hB2eBd Check out the links below and SUBSCRIBE for more youtube.com/user/NurseKillam For help with Research - Get my eBook "Research terminology simplified: Paradigms, axiology, ontology, epistemology and methodology" here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00GLH8R9C Related Videos: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLs4oKIDq23AdTCF0xKCiARJaBaSrwP5P2 Connect with me on Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/NursesDeservePraise Twitter: @NurseKillam https://twitter.com/NurseKillam Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laura.killam LinkedIn: http://ca.linkedin.com/in/laurakillam
Views: 92781 NurseKillam
8. How to write a research paper - Results - Discussions - Conclusions
 
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درس جديد من سلسلة كيف اكتب بحث علمي موضوع الدرس مقسم الى ثلاث اقسام النتائج ومناقشتها باللإضافة الى الاستنتاجات
Views: 846 Aws Zuhair
The Devil in the Details: How to Effectively Research and Interpret Data
 
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Join START for a series of short, half-day workshops on data analysis and interpretation tailored for security and defense professionals. These interactive sessions with START researchers are appropriate for both seasoned practitioners and young professionals looking to improve their ability to make informed judgments in high-pressure and time-sensitive environments. www.start.umd.edu
Views: 389 Start Consortium
Research Data Tabulation and Interpretation - Raw Data - Solve the Mean
 
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#rawdatainterpretation #rawdata #meaninterpretation For more information email [email protected]
Views: 504 Teachers in PH
Analysis of Variance (ANOVA)
 
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A description of the concepts behind Analysis of Variance. There is an interactive visualization here: http://demonstrations.wolfram.com/VisualANOVA/ but I have not tried it, and this: http://rpsychologist.com/d3-one-way-anova has another visualization
Views: 410483 J David Eisenberg
Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: Focus Groups (Module 4)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what it is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to Module 4. Morgan D. Focus groups. Annual Review Sociology 1996;22:129-152. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 69011 YaleUniversity
Results Section for the Research Paper Assignment
 
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How to write the Results section for the Research Paper assignment.
Views: 12776 Jim Ave
Scientific Studies: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
 
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John Oliver discusses how and why media outlets so often report untrue or incomplete information as science. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: http://Facebook.com/LastWeekTonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: http://Twitter.com/LastWeekTonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: http://www.hbo.com/lastweektonight
Views: 13253286 LastWeekTonight
Experimental research design
 
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How experimental research is designed, using control groups and experimental groups. I talk about the Placebo Effect, blinding participants and researchers, dose-response curves, and some interpretation of results.
Views: 4912 Brandon Grasley
Quantum computing explained with a deck of cards | Dario Gil, IBM Research
 
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We are moving rapidly toward quantum computing. How does the technology work and what does it mean for our future? Scientist Dario Gil, VP of Science and Solutions at IBM, provides clarity on this complex topic. David Morczinek gives the introduction. The MIT Venture Capital + Innovation Conference is held annually in February at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Thank you to our lead sponsor IBM Research, as well as Solvay, Wilmer Hale, Finnegan, The MIT Industrial Liaison Program, the MIT Startup Exchange, and Startup Hub Boston. Visit http://www.mitvcconference.com/. Dr. Gil is a leading technologist and senior executive at IBM. As Vice President of Science and Solutions of IBM Research, Dr. Gil directs a global organization of some 1,500 researchers across 11 laboratories. He has direct responsibility for IBM’s science agenda, with a broad portfolio of activities spanning the physical sciences, the mathematical sciences, healthcare and the life sciences. Dr. Gil is also responsible for IBM’s cognitive solutions research agenda, which aims to create scientific and technological breakthroughs to differentiate IBM’s solutions businesses and serves as an incubator for future cognitive industry solutions for IBM and its clients. Prior to his current position, Dr. Gil was the Director of Symbiotic Cognitive Systems, where he led the creation of cognitive environments, highly interactive physical spaces designed to improve the quality of decision-making through always-on ambient intelligence. During his tenure he was responsible for the design and creation of three pioneering laboratories and experiential centers: the Cognitive Environments Laboratory, the IBM Research THINKLab and the IBM Watson Experience Center. Dr. Gil is a passionate advocate of collaborative research business models and is the creator and Founding Director of two research consortia: the IBM Research Frontiers Institute and the Smarter Energy Research Institute. An expert in the field of nanofabrication, he led the team that built the world’s first microprocessor with immersion lithography in 2004. Dr. Gil is a frequent speaker at business events, conferences (including TED), universities, research institutions and foundations. His research results have appeared in over 20 international journals and conferences, and he is the author of numerous patents. Dr. Gil is a member of the Future Trends Forum, the Industrial Advisory Group of the Institute of Photonic Sciences and an elected member of the IBM Academy of Technology. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Sampling & its 8 Types: Research Methodology
 
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Dr. Manishika Jain in this lecture explains the meaning of Sampling & Types of Sampling Research Methodology Population & Sample Systematic Sampling Cluster Sampling Non Probability Sampling Convenience Sampling Purposeful Sampling Extreme, Typical, Critical, or Deviant Case: Rare Intensity: Depicts interest strongly Maximum Variation: range of nationality, profession Homogeneous: similar sampling groups Stratified Purposeful: Across subcategories Mixed: Multistage which combines different sampling Sampling Politically Important Cases Purposeful Sampling Purposeful Random: If sample is larger than what can be handled & help to reduce sample size Opportunistic Sampling: Take advantage of new opportunity Confirming (support) and Disconfirming (against) Cases Theory Based or Operational Construct: interaction b/w human & environment Criterion: All above 6 feet tall Purposive: subset of large population – high level business Snowball Sample (Chain-Referral): picks sample analogous to accumulating snow Advantages of Sampling Increases validity of research Ability to generalize results to larger population Cuts the cost of data collection Allows speedy work with less effort Better organization Greater brevity Allows comprehensive and accurate data collection Reduces non sampling error. Sampling error is however added. Population & Sample @2:25 Sampling @6:30 Systematic Sampling @9:25 Cluster Sampling @ 11:22 Non Probability Sampling @13:10 Convenience Sampling @15:02 Purposeful Sampling @16:16 Advantages of Sampling @22:34 #Politically #Purposeful #Methodology #Systematic #Convenience #Probability #Cluster #Population #Research #Manishika #Examrace For IAS Psychology postal Course refer - http://www.examrace.com/IAS/IAS-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-IAS-Psychology-Series.htm For NET Paper 1 postal course visit - https://www.examrace.com/CBSE-UGC-NET/CBSE-UGC-NET-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-CBSE-UGC-NET-Paper-I-Series.htm
Views: 222366 Examrace
Choosing which statistical test to use - statistics help
 
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Seven different statistical tests and a process by which you can decide which to use. The tests are: Test for a mean, test for a proportion, difference of proportions, difference of two means - independent samples, difference of two means - paired, chi-squared test for independence and regression. This video draws together videos about Helen, her brother, Luke and the choconutties.
Views: 629356 Dr Nic's Maths and Stats
The Scientific Power of Meditation
 
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How exactly does meditation affect your body? GET THE BOOK! http://asapscience.com/book SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/10kWnZ7 Written by: Rachel Salt, Gregory Brown and Mitchell Moffit FOLLOW US--- Instagram and Twitter: @whalewatchmeplz and @mitchellmoffit Clickable: http://bit.ly/16F1jeC and http://bit.ly/15J7ube Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1fjWszw Twitter: http://bit.ly/1d84R71 Tumblr: http://bit.ly/1amIPjF Vine: Search "AsapSCIENCE" on vine! Created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). ----References---- Colzato, L.S., A. Ozturk, and B. Hommel, Meditate to create: the impact of focused-attention and open-monitoring training on convergent and divergent thinking. Frontiers in Psychology, 2012. 3(116): p. 1-5. Davidson, R.J., et al., Alterations in brain and immune function produced by mindfulness meditation. Psychosomatic Medicine, 2003. 65: p. 564-570. Goyal, M., et al., Meditation programs for psychological stress and well-being a systematic review and meta-analysis. JAMA Internal Medicine, 2011. 174(3): p. 357-368. Farb, N.A.S., et al., Minding one’s emotions: mindfulness training alters the neural expression of sadness. Emotion, 2010. 10(1): p. 25-33. 9. Kerr, C.E., et al., Effects of mindfulness meditation training on anticipatory alpha modulation in primary somatosensory cortex. Brain Research Bulletin, 2011. 85: p. 96-103. Ditto, B., M. Eclache, and N. Goldman, Short-term autonomic and cardiovascular effects of mindfulness body scan meditation. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 2006. 32: p. 228-234. Epel, E., et al., Can meditation slow rate of cellular aging, cognitive stress, mindfulness, and telomeres. Longevity, regeneration, and optimal health, 2009. 1172: p. 34-53. Kilpatrick, L.A., et al., Impact of mindfulness-based stress reduction training on intrinsic brain connectivity. NeuroImage, 2011. 56: p. 290–298. Ospina, M.B., et al., Clinical trials of meditation practices in health care:characteristics and quality. The Journal of Alternative And Complementary Medicine, 2008. 14(10): p. 1199–1213. Yu, X., et al., Activation of the anterior prefrontal cortex and serotonergic system is associated with improvements in mood and EEG changes induced by Zen meditation practice in novices. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 2011. 80: p. 103-111. Hölzel, B.K., et al., Mindfulness practice leads to increases in regional brain gray matter density. Psychiatry Research: Neuroimaging, 2011. 191: p. 36-43. Luders, E., et al., The unique brain anatomy of meditation practitioners: alterations in cortical gyrification. frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 2012. 6(34): p. 1-9. Hasenkamp, W. and L.W. Barsalou, Effects of meditation experience on functional connectivity of distributed brain networks. frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 2012. 6(38): p. 1-14. Carlson, L.E., et al., Mindfulness-based cancer recovery and supportive-expressive therapy maintain telomere length relative to controls in distressed breast cancer survivors.
Views: 2970132 AsapSCIENCE
What is UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH? What does UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH mean? UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH meaning
 
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What is UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH? What does UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH mean? UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH meaning - UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH definition - UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Unobtrusive research (or unobtrusive measures) is a method of data collection used primarily in the social sciences. The term "unobtrusive measures" was first coined by Webb, Campbell, Schwartz, & Sechrest in a 1966 book titled Unobtrusive Measures: nonreactive research in the social sciences. The authors described methodologies which do not involve direct elicitation of data from the research subjects. Unobtrusive measures are contrasted with interviews and questionnaires, in that they try to find indirect ways to obtain the necessary data. The unobtrusive approach often seeks unusual data sources, such as garbage, graffiti and obituaries, as well as more conventional ones such as published statistics. Unobtrusive measures should not be perceived as an alternative to more reactive methods such as interviews, surveys and experiments, but rather as an additional tool in the tool chest of the social researcher. Unobtrusive measures can assist in tackling known biases such as selection bias and experimenter's bias. Webb and his colleagues emphasize the importance of triangulating the results obtained through various methodologies, each with its own unique set of (usually unknown) biases. The proliferation of digital media opened a new era for communication researchers in search of unobtrusively obtained data sources. Online communication creates digital footprints that can allow an analysis of data that are obtained through unobtrusive methods, and are also massively larger than any corpora obtained via elicitation and human transcription. These footprints can now be used to analyze topics such as the content of communication events, the process of communication, and the structure of the communicative network. The surge of Internet-sourced research data rekindled the discussion of the ethical aspects of using unobtrusively obtained data. For example, can all data collected in the public domain be used for research purposes? When should we seek consent, and is it realistic to require informed consent from sources of unobtrusively collected data? These questions do not have a simple answer, and the solution is a result of a careful and ongoing dialog between researchers, and between researchers and society.
Views: 743 The Audiopedia
Research Methodology, Data Analysis & Interpretation Training
 
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Research Methodology, Data Analysis & Interpretation Training
Research Methodology Lecture 01 - Meaning of Research - Dr D S Janbandhu
 
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Research Methodology Lecture 01 - Dr D S Janbandhu Dual Language - English and Marathi School of Architecture, Science and Technology (AST), Yashwantrao Chavan Maharashtra Open University (YCMOU), Nashik - 422222, Maharashtra, India Visit Us Here: https://www.facebook.com/ycmouast/
Views: 32486 YCMOU
How to Read a CT Scan of the Head - MEDZCOOL
 
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Reading a CT scan in a systematic way in the Emergency Department can help you quickly and thoroughly assess for any neurological pathology. Remember the mnemonic "Blood Can Be Very Bad" Follow Us on Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/medzcoolmedia Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/medzcool/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/medzcool CodeHealth: https://codehealth.io/medzcool Support Medzcool in Making More Educational Content: https://www.patreon.com/medzcool
Views: 167587 Medzcool
MY DNA -- FUNNY SCIENCE
 
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Macrogen 21st Anniversary We are passionate about research, from the collection of samples to the interpretation of results. Thanks to MACROGEN we can develop our scientific skills. #HAPPY #BIRTHDAY 21st #macrogen #DNA #Macrogen
Views: 321 gYml1n
✡ Believe in God in 5 Minutes (Scientific Proof)
 
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Gerald Schroeder is a scientist with over thirty years of experience in research and teaching. He earned his Bachelor's, Master's, and Doctorate degrees all at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, with his doctorate thesis being under the supervision of physics professor Robley D. Evans. This was followed by five years on the staff of the MIT physics department prior to moving to Israel, where he joined the Weizmann Institute of Science and then the Volcani Research Institute, while also having a laboratory at The Hebrew University. His Doctorate is in two fields: Earth sciences and physics. Donate to Sinai Speak: http://jewcer.com/project/sinai-speak-the-online-channel-for-jewish-education Website: http://SinaiSpeak.com http://geraldschroeder.com Profile: http://sinaispeak.com/dr-gerald-schroeder Facebook: http://facebook.com/sinaispeak Twitter: http://twitter.com/SinaiSpeak Gerald Schroeder is a scientist with over thirty years of experience in research and teaching. He earned his Bachelor's, Master's, and Doctorate degrees all at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, with his doctorate thesis being under the supervision of physics professor Robley D. Evans. This was followed by five years on the staff of the MIT physics department prior to moving to Israel, where he joined the Weizmann Institute of Science and then the Volcani Research Institute, while also having a laboratory at The Hebrew University. His Doctorate is in two fields: Earth sciences and physics. Schroeder's formal theological training in biblical, talmudic and kabalistic interpretation includes fifteen years of study under the late Rabbi Herman Pollack, Rabbi Chaim Brovender and Rabbi Noah Weinberg, of blessed memory. The scientific career that Schroeder chose has given him varied and often unusual experiences. In his work with nuclear disarmament, he has been present at the detonation of six atomic bombs. Work in control of radioactivity has put him hundreds of meters below ground in U.S. and foreign uranium mines. Within this research, he invented and had patented the first real time monitor for airborne alpha beta gamma emitters. The government of the People's Republic of China, during the decade before it established direct contacts with Israel, was willing to overlook his Jerusalem address and had him as a frequent advisor. He also has consulted for agencies of the governments of Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Canada, USA. Invitations for him to lecture have come from around the world. He has over 60 publications in the world's leading scientific journals on topics ranging from the radon atmosphere of the moon (in Science) to the metabolism of mother's milk (in Nutrition Reports International). The results of Schroeder's work have been reported in Time, Newsweek, Scientific American and in newspapers as far apart as Boston and Adelaide. His formal training in chemistry, physics and the Earth and planetary sciences provides the basis for the broad scientific perspective he brings to his books and lectures. For the past twenty-five years, Dr. Schroeder has also pursued a study of ancient biblical interpretation. An ability to handle the biblical material in the original languages allows him to tap the subtle depths contained in the original texts. These nuances are often missed when working with translations. The uniqueness and success of Schroeder's approach integrating biblical and scientific knowledge is demonstrated by the success of his first book, Genesis and the Big Bang (published by Bantam Doubleday), and the wide acclaim for his second book The Science of God (published by The Free Press of Simon & Schuster and Broadway Books of Bantam Doubleday) which was on the Barnes & Noble list of non-fiction best sellers and was Amazon.com's best selling book in the field of physics/cosmology for all of 1998. This was followed by The Hidden Face of God, discovering the unity that binds all existence (published by The Free Press of Simon & Schuster). His book, God According to God, A scientist proves we've been wrong about God all along, was published in May 2009 with HarperOne and has enthusiastic endorsements by leading theologians, both Jewish and Christian, and a Noble Laureate scientist.
Views: 2986654 Sinai Speak
David Savitz, Ph.D - Interpreting Epidemiologic Evidence: The Art of Using Research Wisely.
 
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The Society for Epidemiologic Research Talk. Interpreting Epidemiologic Evidence: The Art of Using Research Wisely. David Savitz, PhD Vice President for Research & Professor of Epidemiology School of Public Health, Brown University David A. Savitz, PhD, is Vice President for Research and Professor of Epidemiology and Obstetrics and Gynecology at Brown University. His research has addressed a wide range of important public health issues including hazards in the workplace, the environmental effects of energy development, childhood obesity, pesticides and breast cancer, pregnancy health risks from environmental exposures, drinking water safety, and ethnicity and birth outcomes. He is the author of the widely used textbook, “Interpreting Epidemiologic Evidence.” Also see companion panel discussion of event https://youtu.be/dYWI0vQQZEk Event held at the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University http://health.oregonstate.edu/
Genetic Testing Reports: The Bad, The OK and The Ideal
 
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Learn more about genetics: http://go.dirtygenes.com/book Learn more about StrateGene: http://go.strategene.org/genetic-analysis/ How to Use StrateGene: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tkemqns2GkQ This is Dr Ben Lynch giving clinical insights on a new tool for interpreting genetic testing results - not reading and no teleprompter. Join Like-Minded Folks here on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drbenjaminlynch iTunes free podcast: http://apple.co/1GzJiZS Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrBenLynch Instagram: https://instagram.com/seekinghealthei/ LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/benjaminlynch/ ---------------------------- VIDEO SUMMARY ---------------------------- Get help interpreting 23&Me data with a StrateGene report. StrateGene is a tool that provides information on clinically relevant SNPs, includes the biochemical pathways and identifies factors which influence SNPs, kinetic impact, and potential associated symptoms and conditions. ------------------------------------------ EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE ------------------------------------------ Did you like this video? Ready for exponential growth? A SHEI membership gives you access to hours of FREE conference recordings, educational and conference discounts, professional & general public forums and more! Visit http://www.seekinghealth.org/product/membership for more information. All of SHEI education is purely educational. There are NO product recommendations or 'sales pitches'. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ABOUT SEEKING HEALTH EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTE ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Seeking Health Educational Institute (SHEI) identifies and assimilates clinically-relevant research in the areas of nutrigenomics and methylation. We then deliver it to the health professional – and layperson – via webinars, seminars, conferences, forums, podcasts, videos and articles. As the leader in nutrigenomics and methylation research interpretation, SHEI is the trusted resource for health professionals and laypersons worldwide. Our Promise To change the healthcare model from disease-based medicine towards an integrative systems approach one healthcare professional at a time. To provide accurate, efficient and effective clinical tools. To strive towards optimizing life. Our Mission Providing education for both health professionals and laypersons in the art of integrating nutrigenomics with the principles of Vis Medicatrix Naturae, Tolle Causum, Tolle Totum and Docere. -------------------------------------------------- RESEARCHED FORMULATIONS ------------------------------------------------ Here is where you will find researched supplement formulations by Dr Lynch: http://www.seekinghealth.com Health professionals are eligible for wholesale pricing: http://www.seekinghealth.com/wholesale
Views: 69845 Dr Ben Lynch
What Is The Meaning Of Validity In Research?
 
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Reliability is a necessary ingredient for determining the overall validity of scientific experiment and enhancing strength results. Jan 2009 conclusions drawn from analyzing survey data are only acceptable to the degree which they determined valid. In simple terms, validity refers to how well an instrument as measures what it is intended measure. Although this is not a very make sure your goals and objectives are clearly defined operationalized. Definition validity aqr. Assessing the validity of evaluation research by means meta. 80, it is said to have very good reliability; If it is below. Institute for work & healthvalidity and reliability how to know if the research is correct? . The everyday use of these terms provides a sense what they mean (for example, your opinion is valid; Your friends are reliable). Reliability and validity in research definitions, examples. Reliability and validity student outcomes assessment. One of internal validity refers to whether the effects observed in a study are due manipulation independent variable and not some other factor. Dissertation for the degree of doctor philosophiaethe faculty social sciencesrune elvikisbn 82 480 0091 5 Reliability and validity in research definitions, examples. 50, it would not be considered a very reliable test. Jul 2016 reliability and validity explained in plain englishhow the terms are used inside outside of research word 'valid' is derived from latin validus, meaning strong. Case illustrations from road safety research. Research validity in surveys relates to the extent at which survey measures right elements that need be measured. Internal validity refers to the of measurement and test itself, whereas external ability generalise findings target population 8 nov 2013. Debate between social and pure scientists, concerning reliability, is robust ongoing types of validityface validity ascertains that the measure appears to be assessing intended construct under study. The validity of a measurement tool (for example, test in education) is considered to be the degree which measures what it claims measure; In this case, an equivalent accuracy. If the study were to be done a second time, would it yield same results? so, data are reliable. Validity (statistics) wikipediaintroduction reliability and validity uc davis, psychology. What is validity and why it important in research? The of measurement definition, importance study activecampaign email marketing blogvalidity reliability. Reliability alone is not enough, measures need to be reliable, as well as, valid. Generally, if the reliability of a standardized test is above. Psychological assessment is an important part of both experimental research and clinical treatment. Chapter 3 validity and reliabilityrevisesociology. What exactly does this mean? Validity is a measure of how well test measures what it claims to. In the same way, this study explores whether these three steps are successfully implemented in picture vocabulary test, as
Research dissemination - Reporting and sharing your research
 
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Before you begin to disseminate your research; it’s worth taking a few steps to make sure you get the process right! Professor Ellen McIntyre, Director of PHCRIS, offers some useful tips on spreading the word about your research.
Views: 3838 PHCRIS