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Search results “Research results interpretation”
Interpreting Research
 
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Elisabet Tiselius, conference interpreter and PhD student in interpreting studies, gives an overview of interpreting research. She talks about the origins of research in interpreting, shows some models used to identify and map interpreting and shares some research secrets. For more information and list of references in the speech go to A WORD IN YOUR EAR: http://lourdesderioja.com/
Views: 2526 lourdes De Rioja
Threats to Validity: What You Should Know to Interpret Research Findings
 
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Presented by Fran Featherston, Ph.D. Our lives are full of findings from research results. Not all of the claims they make are valid. Some studies use samples that are not representative. Other studies make claims when they have no comparison group. The question wording or even question order can bias survey results. How do you know when you can trust the research claims? What do you need to look for? This talk will give you tips to judge the research you read. Dr. Featherston looks at examples from the current news and discuss what you need to know to judge whether the research finding can be trusted. She also discusses the threats to validity for each study and whether the research meets the standard of reproducibility. That is, could another researcher possibly reproduce this finding? Fran Featherston is retired from the U.S. federal government where she worked 27 years as a researcher at the National Science Foundation (10 years) and the Governmental Accountability Office (17 years). Her areas of expertise are survey research, research design, and designing methods that are user friendly. She also worked for the State of Washington’s court systems so that she has experienced the challenges of designing high quality research for all three branches of government.
Views: 6898 NCASVideo
Research Methodology Lecture 30 - Interpretation of Results and Discussion - Dr D S Janbandhu
 
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Research Methodology Lecture 30 - Dr D S Janbandhu Dual Language - English and Marathi School of Architecture, Science and Technology (AST), Yashwantrao Chavan Maharashtra Open University (YCMOU), Nashik - 422222, Maharashtra, India Visit Us Here: https://www.facebook.com/ycmouast/
Views: 2644 YCMOU
Writing the Results Section for Research Papers
 
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The Results section of a scientific research paper represents the core findings of a study derived from the methods applied to gather and analyze information. It presents these findings in a logical sequence without bias or interpretation from the author, setting up the reader for later interpretation and evaluation in the Discussion section. This video explains what the purpose of the Results section is, what it includes, and how to structure and compose your study's findings in a research paper. Wordvice YouTube videos: "How to Write a Research Paper Introduction" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FTC-5P1VFFU) "Which Verb Tenses to Use in a Research Paper" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gcuL_IaRtXc) "How to Write an Abstract for a Research Paper" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMEnRBss6V4) "How to Write a Research Paper Title" (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fl1q-I3bE0c) Wordvice Resources Page "Useful Phrases for Academic Writing" (https://wordvice.com/useful-phrases-for-writing-academic-papers/) "Common Transition Terms in Academic Paper" (https://wordvice.com/common-transition-terms-used-in-academic-papers/) "Active and Passive Voice in Research Papers" (https://wordvice.com/video-should-i-use-active-or-passive-voice-in-a-research-paper/) "100+ Verbs That Will Make Your Research Writing Amazing" (https://wordvice.com/recommended-verbs-for-research-writing/) "Tips for Paraphrasing in Research Papers" (https://wordvice.com/a-guide-to-paraphrasing-in-research-papers-apa-ama/) External Resources University of Minnesota. "Guidelines for Writing a Literature Review." (http://www.duluth.umn.edu/~hrallis/guides/researching/litreview.html) The UNC Writing Center. "Literature Reviews." (https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/literature-reviews/) Wordvice offers editing services in several languages and countries: ENGLISH: https://www.wordvice.com KOREA: https://www.essayreview.co.kr JAPAN: https://www.wordvice.jp CHINA: https://www.wordvice.cn TAIWAN: https://www.wordvice.com.tw TURKEY: https://www.wordvice.com.tr
Machine Learning Research & Interpreting Neural Networks
 
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Machine learning and neural networks change how computers and humans interact, but they can be complicated to understand. In this episode of Coffee with a Googler, Laurence Moroney (@lmoroney) sits down with Christoper Olah (@ch402) from the Google Brain team to chat about Distill. Distill is a platform for interactive research, peer review, and community to make machine learning and neural networks more interpretable and accessible. Watch to get a deep dive into some of the research Distill focuses on, Lucid, Deep Dream, and more! Visit the site to start diving into research → https://distill.pub Read more about Feature Visualization → http://bit.ly/2JxzzBB Read more about Interpretability → http://bit.ly/2LNs1HB Watch more Coffee with a Googler → http://bit.ly/CoffeeWithAGoogler Subscribe to the Google Developers channel → http://bit.ly/googledevs
Views: 18638 Google Developers
Is Most Published Research Wrong?
 
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Mounting evidence suggests a lot of published research is false. Check out Audible: http://bit.ly/AudibleVe Support Veritasium on Patreon: http://bit.ly/VePatreon Patreon supporters: Bryan Baker, Donal Botkin, Tony Fadell, Jason Buster, Saeed Alghamdi More information on this topic: http://wke.lt/w/s/z0wmO The Preregistration Challenge: https://cos.io/prereg/ Resources used in the making of this video: Why Most Published Research Findings Are False: http://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.0020124 Trouble at the Lab: http://www.economist.com/news/briefing/21588057-scientists-think-science-self-correcting-alarming-degree-it-not-trouble Science isn't broken: http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/science-isnt-broken/#part1 Visual effects by Gustavo Rosa
Views: 1813920 Veritasium
How to Read a Research Paper
 
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Ever wondered how I consume research so fast? I'm going to describe the process i use to read lots of machine learning research papers fast and efficiently. It's basically a 3-pass approach, i'll go over the details and show you the extra resources I use to learn these advanced topics. You don't have to be a PhD, anyone can read research papers. It just takes practice and patience. Please Subscribe! And like. And comment. That's what keeps me going. Want more education? Connect with me here: Twitter: https://twitter.com/sirajraval Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sirajology instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval More learning resources: http://www.arxiv-sanity.com/ https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/ https://www.elsevier.com/connect/infographic-how-to-read-a-scientific-paper https://www.quora.com/How-do-I-start-reading-research-papers-on-Machine-Learning https://www.reddit.com/r/MachineLearning/comments/6rj9r4/d_how_do_you_read_mathheavy_machine_learning/ https://machinelearningmastery.com/how-to-research-a-machine-learning-algorithm/ http://www.sciencemag.org/careers/2016/03/how-seriously-read-scientific-paper Join us in the Wizards Slack channel: http://wizards.herokuapp.com/ And please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3191693 Signup for my newsletter for exciting updates in the field of AI: https://goo.gl/FZzJ5w
Views: 195243 Siraj Raval
Survey Research Methods Interpreting & Reporting Results
 
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On Tuesday, December 4, 2012, at 2 p.m. ET, The TASA Group, Inc., in conjunction with consulting statistician Dr. Jack B. ReVelle, presented a free, one-hour, interactive webinar, Survey Research Methods: Interpreting & Reporting Results, for all legal professionals. Survey Research Methods was the third installment of the three-part webinar series, Statistical Tools for Attorneys in Litigation. Part 1, “Introduction to Data,” and Part 2, “The Basic Tools,’ were presented in the Spring of 2012. Part 3, “Survey Research Methods,” is composed of four phases: “Planning and Designing a Survey,” “Developing Survey Instruments,” “Collecting and Processing Data,” and “Interpreting and Reporting Results.” During this program, "Interpreting & Reporting Results," the presenter will covered: * Analyzing the Results * Interpreting Statistics * Reporting the Information About the Expert Jack B. ReVelle, Ph.D., is a consulting statistician with a Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering and Management from Oklahoma State University. Dr. ReVelle provides his technical assistance in both quality and industrial engineering to attorneys involved in litigation.
Views: 1110 The TASA Group, Inc
How Scientists Manipulate Research With P-Value
 
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Numbers don’t lie, right? Or are scientists intentionally using statistics to mislead us? Top 5 Things Wrong With Science ►►►►http://bit.ly/1pILTAB Sign Up For The TestTube Newsletter Here ►►►► http://bit.ly/1myXbFG Read More: The ASA's statement on p-values: context, process,and purpose http://amstat.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00031305.2016.1154108#aHR0cDovL2Ftc3RhdC50YW5kZm9ubGluZS5jb20vZG9pL3BkZi8xMC4xMDgwLzAwMDMxMzA1LjIwMTYuMTE1NDEwOEBAQDA= “Underpinning many published scientific conclusions is the concept of ‘statistical significance,’ typically assessed with an index called the p-value. While the p-value can be a useful statistical measure, it is commonly misused and misinterpreted.” Evolution of Reporting P Values in the Biomedical Literature, 1990-2015 http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2503172 “In this analysis of P values reported in MEDLINE abstracts and in PMC articles from 1990-2015...almost all abstracts and articles with P values reported statistically significant results, and, in a subgroup analysis, few articles included confidence intervals, Bayes factors, or effect sizes. Rather than reporting isolated P values, articles should include effect sizes and uncertainty metrics.” ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Lissette Padilla on Twitter https://twitter.com/lizzette DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq Sign Up For The TestTube Mailing List: http://dne.ws/1McUJdm
Views: 117137 Seeker
The Devil in the Details: How to Effectively Research and Interpret Data
 
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Join START for a series of short, half-day workshops on data analysis and interpretation tailored for security and defense professionals. These interactive sessions with START researchers are appropriate for both seasoned practitioners and young professionals looking to improve their ability to make informed judgments in high-pressure and time-sensitive environments. www.start.umd.edu
Views: 414 Start Consortium
Research Methodology, Data Analysis & Interpretation
 
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Research Methodology, Data Analysis & Interpretation- 073
Sharing research results: It’s not just data anymore
 
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Illinois professor Victoria Stodden talks about the importance and challenges of sharing data and code with research results.
Views: 1682 Illinois1867
How To Use Google Trends, 2019 Update! Market Research To Compare Keywords, Topics & Niches, Fast!
 
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How to use Google Trends for internet marketers... The 2019 edition! Learn how to leverage Google's data to compare trends in keywords, niches and topic ideas in seconds. Use Google Trends for your market research to get a competitive edge on your competition, every time! Google trends was officially launched in May of 2006 and has become one of the world's most powerful niche and market research tool available free to you, every day! Whether you are trying to compare keyword search volume over time, or identifying which niches are currently trending to focus your marketing efforts, with a few clicks of the mouse you will be able to visually identify what is trending in the mindset of your target audience. If you want more help with keyword research and how to create your master keyword list, watch this video next: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eofkzs0fVOA Why is it important to know what is trending in the mass consciousness of your target market? Easy... People turn to Google's search bar for their deepest and most urgent questions. The questions they search and the phrases they use to create a massive dataset that begins to paint a picture of the biggest desires within your audience. Once you understand what the trending desires and questions are within your target market, you are able to create niche websites, articles, videos, podcast episodes, products and services to help your audience achieve their true desires. You see, desire is not created within your audience... Their desires are already there. Your job as an internet marketer is to tap into their desires, answer their questions, help them avoid their fears and ultimately achieve their goals and desires. When you are able to see what questions, desires and fears are trending, in nearly real-time, you have a very clear picture of what content and products are being requested by your audience. The Google Trends tool is the key to unlock this mystery behind your audience's deepest desires! This video shows you how to use Google Trends in 2018, quickly and efficiently so you can get the information you need, fast... And so you can get back to the 'work' that is creating the content or products. We start by looking at how to use Google Trends as a niche research tool, starting with the 'Vegan Dog Food' niche example I've used in several other videos. If you are at this point, working on niche research, trying to find your main niche, be sure to check out my playlist on niche research that shows how to use other tools to do even more niche research: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIZxKpnesTw&list=PL0sOKzn__yK3bPvVRts4CXOtPciYcu7iZ From here we move on to some big trending topics around Bitcoin and Ethereum looking at how the search volumes even track the price of these coins, to show how deep the Google Trends data truly goes. From here you will learn how to get additional topic ideas and keyword ideas from the Trends tool, too. The third example is how to identify seasonal trends, patterns and potential challenges for niches that have very seasonal buying seasons. Before entering a niche you need to know if it is consistent throughout the year or if it has low points through the year. If there are low points, all is not lost... You will see how to find counter-seasonal topics or products to fill in your low season through this tool! Finally, we look at trends in diet patterns, from the New Year's bump to the long-term patterns in lifestyle diets vs. diet fads. This gives a clear picture of what kinds of products people would purchase and what times of years would have the best chance to sell those products. If you have a list in the health and wellness space, you could leverage this information to know exactly what day each year would be the most profitable to launch a specific product offer, whether it is your product or an affiliate offer. Again, I believe it is through more effective and consistent market research that you unlock the opportunity to be more strategic than your competitors. Most people don't take the time to do the research... If you habituate the process of learning how to use Google Trends and the keyword research tool, you will find yourself gaining rankings in your blog, your YouTube channel and you will experience more conversions. My other favorite research process for niche research and content marketing is keyword research. You can get my full keyword research video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O_FfdjNOgpQ Once you have the keywords and have created your content, you need to know how to implement those phrases into your content marketing... This free SEO course shows exactly what to do, where and why! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8EI6JaFbv4 How To Use Google Trends, 2018 Update! Market Research To Compare Keywords, Topics & Niches, Fast! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u75nbWDqymA
Views: 93698 Miles Beckler
Research Methods - Interpreting Inferential Statistics
 
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This A Level / IB Psychology revision video for Research Methods looks at interpreting inferential statistics.
Views: 20861 tutor2u
Understanding the p-value - Statistics Help
 
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With Spanish subtitles. This video explains how to use the p-value to draw conclusions from statistical output. It includes the story of Helen, making sure that the choconutties she sells have sufficient peanuts. You might like to read my blog: http://learnandteachstatistics.wordpress.com
Views: 772011 Dr Nic's Maths and Stats
Things To Consider When Interpreting Research (inspired by Dr. Travis Beck)
 
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NOTE: Many of the thoughts and ideas for this presentation came from or have been inspired by Dr. Travis Beck, University of Oklahoma A great thought provoking and educational narrated powerpoint by Jeremy Loenneke PhD(c) on the importance of critically analyzing research findings. Sorry the audio is a bit droned, had to record the audio portion from a cell phone
Views: 4078 De Novo
What is RESEARCH ETHICS? What does RESEARCH ETHICS mean? RESEARCH ETHICS meaning & explanation
 
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✪✪✪✪✪ WORK FROM HOME! Looking for US WORKERS for simple Internet data entry JOBS. $15-20 per hour. SIGN UP here - http://jobs.theaudiopedia.com ✪✪✪✪✪ ✪✪✪✪✪ The Audiopedia Android application, INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wTheAudiopedia_8069473 ✪✪✪✪✪ What is RESEARCH ETHICS? What does RESEARCH ETHICS mean? RESEARCH ETHICS meaning - RESEARCH ETHICS definition - RESEARCH ETHICS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Research ethics involves the application of fundamental ethical principles to a variety of topics involving research, including scientific research. These include the design and implementation of research involving human experimentation, animal experimentation, various aspects of academic scandal, including scientific misconduct (such as fraud, fabrication of data and plagiarism), whistleblowing; regulation of research, etc. Research ethics is most developed as a concept in medical research. The key agreement here is the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki. The Nuremberg Code is a former agreement, but with many still important notes. Research in the social sciences presents a different set of issues than those in medical research. The academic research enterprise is built on a foundation of trust. Researchers trust that the results reported by others are sound. Society trusts that the results of research reflect an honest attempt by scientists and other researchers to describe the world accurately and without bias. But this trust will endure only if the scientific community devotes itself to exemplifying and transmitting the values associated with ethical research conduct. There are many ethical issues to be taken into serious consideration for research. Sociologists need to be aware of having the responsibility to secure the actual permission and interests of all those involved in the study. They should not misuse any of the information discovered, and there should be a certain moral responsibility maintained towards the participants. There is a duty to protect the rights of people in the study as well as their privacy and sensitivity. The confidentiality of those involved in the observation must be carried out, keeping their anonymity and privacy secure. As pointed out in the BSA for Sociology, all of these ethics must be honoured unless there are other overriding reasons to do so - for example, any illegal or terrorist activity. Research ethics in a medical context is dominated by principlism, an approach that has been criticised as being decontextualised. Research ethics is different throughout different types of educational communities. Every community has its own set of morals. In Anthropology research ethics were formed to protect those who are being researched and to protect the researcher from topics or events that may be unsafe or may make either party feel uncomfortable. It is a widely observed guideline that Anthropologists use especially when doing ethnographic fieldwork. Research informants participating in individual or group interviews as well as ethnographic fieldwork are often required to sign an informed consent form which outlines the nature of the project. Informants are typically assured anonymity and will be referred to using pseudonyms. There is however growing recognition that these formal measures are insufficient and do not necessarily warrant a research project 'ethical'. Research with people should therefore not be based solely on dominant and de-contextualised understandings of ethics, but should be negotiated reflexively and through dialogue with participants as a way to bridge global and local understandings of research ethics. In Canada, there are many different types of research ethic boards that approve applications for research projects. The most common document that Canadian Universities follow is the Tri-Council Policy Statement. However, there are other types of documents geared towards different educational aspects such as: biology, clinical practices, bio-technics and even stem cell research. The Tri-Council is actually the top three government grant agencies in Canada. If one was to do research in Canada and apply for funds, their project would have to be approved by the Tri-Council. Furthermore, it is the researchers ethical responsibility to not harm the humans they are studying, they also have a responsibility to science, and the public, as well as to future students.
Views: 16692 The Audiopedia
Research Methods - Introduction
 
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In this video, Dr Greg Martin provides an introduction to research methods, methedology and study design. Specifically he takes a look at qualitative and quantitative research methods including case control studies, cohort studies, observational research etc. Global health (and public health) is truly multidisciplinary and leans on epidemiology, health economics, health policy, statistics, ethics, demography.... the list goes on and on. This YouTube channel is here to provide you with some teaching and information on these topics. I've also posted some videos on how to find work in the global health space and how to raise money or get a grant for your projects. Please feel free to leave comments and questions - I'll respond to all of them (we'll, I'll try to at least). Feel free to make suggestions as to future content for the channel. SUPPORT: —————- This channel has a crowd-funding campaign (please support if you find these videos useful). Here is the link: http://bit.ly/GH_support OTHER USEFUL LINKS: ———————— Channel page: http://bit.ly/GH_channel Subscribe: http://bit.ly/GH_subscribe Google+: http://bit.ly/GH_Google Twitter: @drgregmartin Facebook: http://bit.ly/GH_facebook HERE ARE SOME PLAYLISTS ——————————————- Finding work in Global Health: http://bit.ly/GH_working Epidemiology: http://bit.ly/GH_epi Global Health Ethics: http://bit.ly/GH_ethics Global Health Facts: http://bit.ly/GH_facts WANT CAREER ADVICE? ———————————— You can book time with Dr Greg Martin via Google Helpouts to get advice about finding work in the global health space. Here is the link: http://bit.ly/GH_career -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Know how interpret an epidemic curve?" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7SM4PN7Yg1s -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Significance and Meaning: Strategies for Analyzing and Interpreting Research Data
 
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Significance and Meaning introduces the concepts of correlation, causation, and probability.
Views: 1818 CHIP to CHIRP
Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: Data Analysis (Module 5)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what it is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to Module 5. Bradley EH, Curry LA, Devers K. Qualitative data analysis for health services research: Developing taxonomy, themes, and theory. Health Services Research, 2007; 42(4):1758-1772. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 158857 YaleUniversity
How to support Research with Theoretical and Conceptual Frameworks
 
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Supporting Research with Theory I was asked: “how do you support your study relationship based on a theoretical or conceptual framework?” This video gets you to think about … 1) Is your question about a particular theory? 2) Is theory used to justify your question? 3) Is theory used to organize your findings? 4) Is your research about generating a new theory? 5) Is theory useful to explain the context or researcher stance? 6) Is a conceptual framework needed? Examples: Killam, L. A, & Carter, L. M. (2010). Challenges to the student nurse on clinical placement in the rural setting: A review of the literature. Rural and Remote Health, 10(online), 1523. http://www.rrh.org.au/articles/subviewnew.asp?ArticleID=1523 Killam, L. A., & Heerschap, C. (2012). Challenges to student learning in the clinical setting: A qualitative descriptive study. Nurse Education Today. doi: 10.1016/j.nedt.2012.10.008 http://www.nurseeducationtoday.com/article/S0260-6917(12)00360-7/abstract Killam, L. A., Montgomery, P., Raymond, J. M., Mossey, S., Timmermans, K. E., & Binette, J. (2012). Unsafe clinical practices as perceived by final year baccalaureate nursing students: Q methodology. BMC Nursing. doi: 10.1186/1472-6955-11-26 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6955/11/26 Related Links: http://libguides.usc.edu/content.php?pid=83009&sid=618409 http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/research_and_nursing_theories.html Further Reading: http://www.sagepub.com/upm-data/48274_ch_3.pdf http://youstudynursing.com/ Research eBook on Amazon: http://amzn.to/1hB2eBd Check out the links below and SUBSCRIBE for more youtube.com/user/NurseKillam For help with Research - Get my eBook "Research terminology simplified: Paradigms, axiology, ontology, epistemology and methodology" here: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00GLH8R9C Related Videos: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLs4oKIDq23AdTCF0xKCiARJaBaSrwP5P2 Connect with me on Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/NursesDeservePraise Twitter: @NurseKillam https://twitter.com/NurseKillam Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/laura.killam LinkedIn: http://ca.linkedin.com/in/laurakillam
Views: 116159 NurseKillam
The brain benefits of deep sleep -- and how to get more of it |  Dan Gartenberg
 
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There's nothing quite like a good night's sleep. What if technology could help us get more out of it? Dan Gartenberg is working on tech that stimulates deep sleep, the most regenerative stage which (among other wonderful things) might help us consolidate our memories and form our personalities. Find out more about how playing sounds that mirror brain waves during this stage might lead to deeper sleep -- and its potential benefits on our health, memory and ability to learn. Check out more TED Talks: http://www.ted.com The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED
Views: 822459 TED
Interpretation and Discussion in Research - Tubeducation
 
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The intention of creating this channel is to help new academicians and researchers to retain more information, understand concepts more rapidly and getting into academia more efficiently. If you have any ideas or suggestions that would make this Tubeducation more exciting and useful for all, please let us know. Thanks for your visit. Stay tuned!
Views: 237 Tubeducation
Research Methodology, Data Analysis and Interpretation
 
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Research Methodology, Data Analysis and Interpretation- 065
How to interpret data for thesis and action research using t test
 
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This video is for all the graduate students taking up both masteral degree and doctoral degree in education. This video will teach you on how to interpret the data gathered for your thesis and for your action researches. This video will help you lessen your expenses for your thesis result. Because most statisticians who will make the statistical interpretation for your thesis will probably ask you to pay them as much as 10,000 – 20,000 pesos only for the sake of interpreting the data you gathered for your thesis. If you learned the basics on how to interpret data. Even you, yourself can interpret the data you gathered for your thesis or you could even earn as much as 20,000 php for being the one who will interpret others’ thesis. Don’t forget to like and subscribe to support this video. Salamat
Views: 12 The Best
Null Hypothesis, p-Value, Statistical Significance, Type 1 Error and Type 2 Error
 
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SKIP AHEAD: 0:39 – Null Hypothesis Definition 1:42 – Alternative Hypothesis Definition 3:12 – Type 1 Error (Type I Error) 4:16 – Type 2 Error (Type II Error) 4:43 – Power and beta 6:33 – p-Value 8:39 – Alpha and statistical significance 14:15 – Statistical hypothesis testing (t-test, ANOVA & Chi Squared) For the text of this video click here http://www.stomponstep1.com/p-value-null-hypothesis-type-1-error-statistical-significance/ For my video on Confidence Intervals click here http://www.stomponstep1.com/confidence-interval-interpretation-95-confidence-interval-90-99/
Views: 405811 Stomp On Step 1
The Clinical Genome Conference 2014 | Impact on Research and Interpretation of Results
 
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An-Dinh Nguyen interviews Valerie A. Schneider of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), NIH on April 4, 2014. Dr. Schneider will be a speaker at TCGC: The Clinical Genome Conference, June 10-12, 2014 in San Francisco, CA. Topics include updates to the human reference genome assembly, the Genome Reference Consortium (GRC), the relationship of the assembly to annotation and genome browsers, new assembly features and their potential impact on clinical analyses and interpretation of results.
Media Research : Statistics or Data Analysis and Interpretation
 
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This Lecture talks about Statistics or Data Analysis and Interpretation
Views: 1848 Cec Ugc
Understanding Hypothesis testing, p-value, t-test - Statistics Help
 
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This entertaining video works step-by-step through a hypothesis test. Helen wishes to know whether giving away free stickers will increase her chocolate sales. This is a companion video for "Understanding the p-value". You might like to read my blog: http://learnandteachstatistics.wordpress.com
Views: 431439 Dr Nic's Maths and Stats
What is action research?
 
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Here's a short description of action research. TRANSCRIPT: Teaching is a craft. It’s both an art and a science, which is why great teachers always experiment and make tons of mistakes. But how do you know what’s actually working? One option is action research. Here you can identify a question or problem, test out a strategy, gather data, and determine if it works. The end result is something dynamic, innovative, and tied directly to your classroom. Action research dissolves the barrier between participants and researchers. In other words, the teacher actively participates in the situation while conducting the research. There are many action research frameworks, but they generally follow a similar process: You start out in phase one, planning for research. Phase One: Planning for Research It starts with an inquiry process, where you define a specific research question. It needs to be something you can actually test. Next, you conduct a literature review to gain a deeper understanding of the related research. Finally, you move into the design process, where you determine your data methods, consider ethical issues, get required permissions, create deadlines and set up systems. This is where you engage in multiple cycles of experimentation and data collection. Your data collection might include qualitative data, like observations, artifacts, and interviews or quantitative data like rubric scores, surveys, or achievement data. Phase Three: Analysis You will often start by organizing data with charts or graphs and looking for trends. You might also discuss it with peers, free write in a journal, or create a cluster map before eventually writing out your results. Phase Four: Conclusion This is often where you share your research with the world and reflect on your own practice. This will ultimately lead to new questions . . . and the cycle will continue again as you refine your craft as a better, more creative teacher.
Views: 116298 John Spencer
Psychological Research - Crash Course Psychology #2
 
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Want more videos about psychology every Monday and Thursday? Check out our sister channel SciShow Psych at https://www.youtube.com/scishowpsych! So how do we apply the scientific method to psychological research? Lots of ways, but today Hank talks about case studies, naturalistic observation, surveys and interviews, and experimentation. Also he covers different kinds of bias in experimentation and how research practices help us avoid them. -- Table of Contents The Scientific Method 2:06 Case Studies 3:05 Naturalistic Observation 3:48 Surveys and Interviews 4:15 Experimentation 6:35 Proper Research Practices 8:40 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 3207077 CrashCourse
Quarterly Results Review with Interpretation by SMC Research Expert Mr. Dinesh Joshi
 
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Mr. Dinesh Joshi(Sr. Research Analyst,Equity(Fundamental)) giving review with interpretation on "Quarterly Results of HCLTech, DrReddy, Maruti Suzuki and YesBank.
Views: 126 SMC GLOBAL
Research Methodology, Data Analysis & Interpretation Training
 
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Research Methodology, Data Analysis & Interpretation Training
What is UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH? What does UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH mean? UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH meaning
 
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What is UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH? What does UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH mean? UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH meaning - UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH definition - UNOBTRUSIVE RESEARCH explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Unobtrusive research (or unobtrusive measures) is a method of data collection used primarily in the social sciences. The term "unobtrusive measures" was first coined by Webb, Campbell, Schwartz, & Sechrest in a 1966 book titled Unobtrusive Measures: nonreactive research in the social sciences. The authors described methodologies which do not involve direct elicitation of data from the research subjects. Unobtrusive measures are contrasted with interviews and questionnaires, in that they try to find indirect ways to obtain the necessary data. The unobtrusive approach often seeks unusual data sources, such as garbage, graffiti and obituaries, as well as more conventional ones such as published statistics. Unobtrusive measures should not be perceived as an alternative to more reactive methods such as interviews, surveys and experiments, but rather as an additional tool in the tool chest of the social researcher. Unobtrusive measures can assist in tackling known biases such as selection bias and experimenter's bias. Webb and his colleagues emphasize the importance of triangulating the results obtained through various methodologies, each with its own unique set of (usually unknown) biases. The proliferation of digital media opened a new era for communication researchers in search of unobtrusively obtained data sources. Online communication creates digital footprints that can allow an analysis of data that are obtained through unobtrusive methods, and are also massively larger than any corpora obtained via elicitation and human transcription. These footprints can now be used to analyze topics such as the content of communication events, the process of communication, and the structure of the communicative network. The surge of Internet-sourced research data rekindled the discussion of the ethical aspects of using unobtrusively obtained data. For example, can all data collected in the public domain be used for research purposes? When should we seek consent, and is it realistic to require informed consent from sources of unobtrusively collected data? These questions do not have a simple answer, and the solution is a result of a careful and ongoing dialog between researchers, and between researchers and society.
Views: 1372 The Audiopedia
Choosing which statistical test to use - statistics help.
 
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Seven different statistical tests and a process by which you can decide which to use. The tests are: Test for a mean, test for a proportion, difference of proportions, difference of two means - independent samples, difference of two means - paired, chi-squared test for independence and regression. This video draws together videos about Helen, her brother, Luke and the choconutties. There is a sequel to give more practice choosing and illustrations of the different types of test with hypotheses.
Views: 732030 Dr Nic's Maths and Stats
Sampling & its 8 Types: Research Methodology
 
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Dr. Manishika Jain in this lecture explains the meaning of Sampling & Types of Sampling Research Methodology Population & Sample Systematic Sampling Cluster Sampling Non Probability Sampling Convenience Sampling Purposeful Sampling Extreme, Typical, Critical, or Deviant Case: Rare Intensity: Depicts interest strongly Maximum Variation: range of nationality, profession Homogeneous: similar sampling groups Stratified Purposeful: Across subcategories Mixed: Multistage which combines different sampling Sampling Politically Important Cases Purposeful Sampling Purposeful Random: If sample is larger than what can be handled & help to reduce sample size Opportunistic Sampling: Take advantage of new opportunity Confirming (support) and Disconfirming (against) Cases Theory Based or Operational Construct: interaction b/w human & environment Criterion: All above 6 feet tall Purposive: subset of large population – high level business Snowball Sample (Chain-Referral): picks sample analogous to accumulating snow Advantages of Sampling Increases validity of research Ability to generalize results to larger population Cuts the cost of data collection Allows speedy work with less effort Better organization Greater brevity Allows comprehensive and accurate data collection Reduces non sampling error. Sampling error is however added. Population & Sample @2:25 Sampling @6:30 Systematic Sampling @9:25 Cluster Sampling @ 11:22 Non Probability Sampling @13:10 Convenience Sampling @15:02 Purposeful Sampling @16:16 Advantages of Sampling @22:34 #Politically #Purposeful #Methodology #Systematic #Convenience #Probability #Cluster #Population #Research #Manishika #Examrace For IAS Psychology postal Course refer - http://www.examrace.com/IAS/IAS-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-IAS-Psychology-Series.htm For NET Paper 1 postal course visit - https://www.examrace.com/CBSE-UGC-NET/CBSE-UGC-NET-FlexiPrep-Program/Postal-Courses/Examrace-CBSE-UGC-NET-Paper-I-Series.htm types of sampling types of sampling pdf probability sampling types of sampling in hindi random sampling cluster sampling non probability sampling systematic sampling
Views: 334571 Examrace
What is ACCOUNTING RESEARCH? What does ACCOUNTING RESEARCH mean? ACCOUNTING RESEARCH meaning
 
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What is ACCOUNTING RESEARCH? What does ACCOUNTING RESEARCH mean? ACCOUNTING RESEARCH meaning - ACCOUNTING RESEARCH definition - ACCOUNTING RESEARCH explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Accounting research is research on the effects of economic events on the process of accounting, and the effects of reported information on economic events. It encompasses a broad range of research areas including financial accounting, management accounting, auditing and taxation. Academic accounting research "addresses all aspects of the accounting profession" using the scientific method, while research by practicing accountants focuses on solving problems for a client or group of clients. Academic accounting research can make significant contribution to accounting practice, although changes in accounting education and the accounting academia in recent decades has led to a divide between academia and practice in accounting. Accounting research is carried out both by academic researchers and by practicing accountants. Academic accounting research addresses all areas of the accounting profession, and examines issues using the scientific method; it uses evidence from a variety of sources including financial information, experiments, and computer simulations. Research by practicing accountants "focuses on solving immediate problems for a single client or small group of clients" and involve, for example, decision-making on the implementation of new accounting or auditing standards, the presentation of unusual transactions in the financial statements, and the impact of new tax laws on clients. Accounting research is also carried out by accounting organizations such as standard-setting bodies. For example, the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) may initiate research projects for certain issues, the results of these may inform its decision whether to move the issues to its active agenda.
Views: 2701 The Audiopedia
What is PRACTITIONER RESEARCH? What does PRACTITIONER RESEARCH mean? PRACTITIONER RESEARCH meaning
 
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What is PRACTITIONER RESEARCH? What does PRACTITIONER RESEARCH mean? PRACTITIONER RESEARCH meaning - PRACTITIONER RESEARCH definition - PRACTITIONER RESEARCH explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Practitioner Research refers to research and/or workplace research such as evaluation performed by individuals who also work in a professional field as opposed to being full-time academic researchers. Practitioner research developed as a recognized type of research in the last quarter of the 20th century. In this context, 'practitioner' means someone who delivers public services, such as a nurse, teacher, advice worker, probation officer, counselor or social worker. To begin with, practitioner research developed in disciplinary silos, but by the turn of the century it had been recognized that all disciplines could approach practitioner research in broadly the same way. For a practitioner, doing research alongside practice can assist with one or more of the following: Solving a specific problem, such as how to reduce crime on a particular housing estate. Contributing to the learning of a discipline such as education or social work. Influencing government policy, e.g. welfare or health policy. It is also held to improve the quality of the practitioner-researcher's practice. Practitioner research has two categories: Research in the workplace, such as a service evaluation or needs assessment, Academic research related to the practitioner's role, such as a master's degree or PhD in a relevant subject.
Views: 427 The Audiopedia
Dr. Joe Brown- How to Read your Blood work / Labs -FULL DESCRIPTIONS AND HOW TO UNDERSTAND IT
 
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Dr. Joe Brown discusses labs and Blood work (WHITE BLOOD CELLS, ANEMIA, PROTEINS, CHOLESTEROL, KIDNEY AND LIVER FUNCTION, HORMONES) and how to read and understand your blood work. He gives descriptions, definitions, and explanations in detail. Visit: Dr. Joe Brown at http://www.DoctorJoeBrown.com - CANCER SURVIVOR !!! -CLICK SUBSCRIBE TO RECEIVE DR. JOE BROWN'S DAILY INFORMATION VIDEOS
Views: 282359 DrJoe Brown
Why Most Published Research Findings Are False
 
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Dedicated to Tandykane, for being the umpteenth science denialist to throw this article at me: may you learn something from it. John Ioaniddis' article "Why Most Published Research Findings Are False" http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pmed.0020124 More about John. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_P._A._Ioannidis Alex Tabarrok on Marginal Revolution, a great article summarizing the math: http://marginalrevolution.com/marginalrevolution/2005/09/why_most_publis.html Orac's blog, Respectful Insolence, covers the misuse of this research in popular media and the Internet. http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2007/09/the_cranks_pile_on_john_ioannidis_work_o.php Here's Newsweek completely misinterpreting the finding to satisfy an anti-science narrative: http://www.newsweek.com/2011/01/23/why-almost-everything-you-hear-about-medicine-is-wrong.html Dr. Steven Novella on his blog Neurologica: http://theness.com/neurologicablog/index.php/are-most-medical-studies-wrong/
Views: 50661 C0nc0rdance
Common Misunderstandings Related to Statistical Significance Explained | Murphy Research
 
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Statistical significance is commonly discussed in market research, but many people have an incomplete and often inaccurate understanding of how stat testing works and how the results of stat testing should be interpreted. We dive more into what Statistical Significance is and some of its common misunderstandings: http://www.murphyresearch.com/common-misunderstandings-related-to-statistical-significance Subscribe to our Murphy Research channels here: http://www.murphyresearch.com https://www.facebook.com/MurphyResearch https://twitter.com/MurphyResearch https://www.linkedin.com/company/murphy-research https://plus.google.com/u/0/+Murphyresearch/posts http://www.instagram.com/MurphyResearch
Views: 401 Murphy Research
Double Slit Experiment explained! by Jim Al-Khalili
 
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"If you can explain this using common sense and logic, do let me know, because there is a Nobel Prize for you.." Professor Jim Al-Khalili explains the experiment that reveals the "central mystery of quantum mechanics" - the double slit experiment. Watch the full lecture here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwgQVZju1ZM Sometimes called the "two-slit" or "Young's" experiment, it demonstrates that matter and energy can display the characteristics of both waves and particles, establishing the principle known as wave-particle duality. Furthermore, it questions the role of the observer in the outcome of events and demonstrates the fundamental limitation of an observer to predict experimental results. For this reason, Richard Feynman called it "a phenomenon which is impossible ... to explain in any classical way, and which has in it the heart of quantum mechanics. In reality, it contains the only mystery [of quantum mechanics]," (see more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-slit_experiment). The Ri is on Twitter: http://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution and Tumblr: http://ri-science.tumblr.com/ Our editorial policy: http://www.rigb.org/home/editorial-policy Subscribe for the latest science videos: http://bit.ly/RiNewsletter
Views: 1513431 The Royal Institution
Alzheimer's Prevention Research Results
 
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Results of Pilot Study Published in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease Reveal that Meditation Improves Cognition in those with Memory Loss
Views: 8392 Prevent Alzheimers
Research & Evaluation for Testing & Interpretation of Evidence in Publicly Funded Forensic Labs
 
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​This webinar provided details and guidance for potential applicants to NIJ’s solicitation, “Research and Evaluation for the Testing and Interpretation of Physical Evidence in Publicly Funded Forensic Laboratories.” The intent of this research and evaluation effort is to direct findings toward the forensic community, offering best practices for the most efficient, accurate, reliable, and cost-effective methods for the identification, analysis, and interpretation of physical evidence in publicly funded crime laboratories. Through this work, we aim to have a direct and immediate impact on laboratory efficiency and assist in making laboratory policy decisions. (Opinions or points of view expressed represent the speaker and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice. Any product or manufacturer discussed is presented for informational purposes only and do not constitute product approval or endorsement by the U.S. Department of Justice.)
Academic research and writing – Chapter 8 Interpretation – Unit 5 Summary
 
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https://academic-research-and-writing.org Academic research and writing Chapter 8 Interpretation of a topic Unit 5 Summary Abstract: A well-thought-out interpretation of the topic is a prerequisite for the successful execution of a research project. Especially in academic settings, research candidates have not only the duty, but also the right to develop an interpretation of their topics. In some cases, the thesis advisor might assist the interpretation process. In other cases, research candidates have to derive an interpretation on their own. An ideal interpretation process starts with a negative and a positive interpretation of the topic and thereby the identification of possible aims. Once possible aims and their implications are known, the research candidate has to select one aim or a combination of aims. There are five possible aims: description, causal connection, intention, function, and comparison. The interpretation of a topic can be of an abstract (theoretical) or problem-based (applied) nature. Within the process of a problem-based interpretation, the empirical environment has to be considered. The identified aim predetermines the nature of possible research questions to be investigated. Key terms: Interpretation, positive interpretation, negative interpretation, abstract interpretation, problem-based interpretation, aim, description, causal connection, intention, function, comparison, research question Course website: https://academic-research-and-writing... Author's weblog: https://christiandecker.de Supported by: http://icademicus.com